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Geography in the News: Chernobyl’s Legacy

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Chernobyl’s legacy endures Chernobyl is a place known around the world. The meltdown at the Chernobyl power plant in 1986 made front-page news and, until Japan’s Fukushima disaster of 2011, was considered the world’s worst nuclear accident. With North Korea’s recent threats of nuclear…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

Geography in the News: The Gulf of Mexico’s Dead Zone

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Gulf’s Growing Dead Zone With rising demand over the past decade for the corn-based fuel additive ethanol, American farmers have grown more corn than at any time since World War II. Unfortunately, the nitrogen fertilizer being applied to cornfields is contributing to a…

Geography in the News: Majestic Denali

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Denali National Park and Preserve, A North American Treasure In the fall of 2009, documentary filmmaker Ken Burns’ film The National Parks: America’s Best Idea aired on the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Burns, whose film topics range from the Civil War to jazz music…

Geography in the News: Bali, Past Trouble in Paradise

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bali: Past Trouble in Paradise In August 2009, an elite Indonesian police squad killed a man believed to be the most wanted Islamic terrorist in Southeast Asia. Noordin Mohammad Top, a Malaysian born militant, was linked to bombings in Jakarta, Indonesia, and the 2002 bombings on…

Geography in the News: The Scourge of Landmines

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Scourge of Landmines In January 2012, U.S. Navy SEALs stormed an encampment in northern Somalia to rescue two aid workers taken hostage in October 2011. While the rescue itself was newsworthy, the operation also brought to light the workers’ mission in Somalia. They…

Geography in the News: Ukraine’s Crisis

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ukraine’s Russian Crisis In January 2009, the United States signed a pact with Ukraine to establish a U.S. diplomatic office in Simferopol, the capital of the Ukrainian republic of Crimea. The move clearly concerned Moscow. Russia exerts substantial power in Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula…

Geography in the News: Amazing Crater Lake

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Crater Lake: An Awesome Volcanic Wonder Crater Lake is a beautiful caldera lake found in South-central Oregon State, USA. It has a stunning deep blue color and brilliant water clarity and forms the main feature in Crater Lake National Park. The lake is one…

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived…

Geography in the News: Curaçao, Newly Independent Micro-State?

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Curaçao: The Western Hemisphere’s Newly Independent Micro-State Curaçao became an independent country Oct. 10, 2010, making it one of the world’s 195 recognized countries. In a change of constitutional status that dissolved the Dutch Antilles, Curaçao (pronounced “cure a sow”) is now an autonomous…

Geography in the News: Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Remembered

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Geography of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Scholars continue to examine the history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade between Africa and the New World, one of the world’s most dynamic, yet tragic, forced intercontinental migrations. Reviews of a recently published book in the New York…

Geography in the News: Avalanche Warnings!

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Avalanche! Watch Out! “Avalanche!” is one of the most feared warnings in the world’s alpine regions. Roaring down steep mountain slopes at speeds sometimes exceeding 200 miles (322 km.) per hour, snow avalanches present enormous danger to anything in their paths. Heavy, late-November snowfalls…

Geography in the News: Saving the Noble Chestnut

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Noble Chestnut’s Hopeful Return A favorite holiday song lyric composed by Torme and Wells in 1946, “Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire”  (“The Christmas Song”) hearkens to the nostalgic past when chestnuts were plentiful. More than a century ago, a foreign blight began…

Geography in the News: Amelia Earhart’s Legacy

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Amelia Earhart’s Legacy The movie “Amelia,” detailing the life of Amelia Earhart, debuted in the fall of 2009 to mixed reviews. The real life story of Earhart, the aviation pioneer of the 1920s and 30s, however, is a fascinating story filled with intrigue and…

Geography in the News: Malaria

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM  Malaria: The Geography of a Debilitating Disease Malaria has been a longtime scourge upon many countries of the world. Malaria was wiped out in the  U.S. South in the 1930′s, confirming epidemiologists’ and the medical community’s belief that this disease could be eradicated in…