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Striking Picture: Bats Hunt Frogs by Detecting Water Ripples

Male rain forest frogs sing love songs that create water ripples—and attract bat predators, a new study says.

What Can Sexy Robot Frogs Teach Us About Evolution?

Researchers use sexy robot frogs to gain insight into the evolution of complex behaviors.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #13

Explore the wilderness with us… Rhinos are in terrible trouble across Africa. The Kruger National Park, the second oldest protected area on earth, may lose as many as 1,000 rhinos this year! The South African government has reacted by supporting the legal sale of over $100 million of rhino horn. This decision has polarized the…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #11

Explore the wilderness with us… This week we share the “golden wilderness”! The rich colors and textures of the wild can never be replaced or surpassed. Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When…

February 23, 2013: Base Jumping off Mt. Bute, Surviving Butterfly Exploration and More

Dean Potter is the mellowest adrenaline junkie out there. The soft-spoken free soloing, line walking, base jumping 2009 Adventurer of the Year has perfected sky flying, and appears in a recent National Geographic TV show, The Man Who Can Fly. He tells Boyd about his experiences flying off British Columbia’s Mt. Bute. In the first part of his interview, Potter explains to Boyd his love of free solo climbing and explains that sometimes, the safest way down a mountain is to fly off it.

Healing Journey: Trail of the Frozen Frogs

National Geographic grantee and contributor Jon Waterhouse, an avid paddler and Alaska Region Director of the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, is leading the 2010 Healing Journey down the Koyukuk River from Coldfoot to Koyukuk, Alaska. Along the way, he’s calling from the field via satellite phone to share stories with BlogWild readers of the…

Warming is Killing Yellowstone’s Amphibians, Researchers Find

Disappearing ponds, lakes, and wetlands in Yellowstone National Park have caused a catastrophic decrease in the world’s oldest nature reserve’s frog and salamander populations, Stanford University researchers say. Colombia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), in Yellowstone National Park. Photo by Lauren Palumbi. “Precipitous declines of purportedly unthreatened amphibians … indicate that the ecological effects of global…

Tree Frog Once Thought Lost Is Found

  A tiny tree frog not seen for twenty years and thought to be extinct has been spotted in Costa Rica’s Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve. Scientists from the University of Manchester and Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom saw and photographed a male specimen of the frog Isthmohyla rivularis last year. A search of the…