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Tag archives for freshwater species of the week

Rare Siamese Crocodiles Released as Ambassadors for Laotian Wetland

Seventeen Critically Endangered juvenile Siamese crocodiles have been released into into a protected wetland in Laos, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today. The Siamese crocodile is named Freshwater Species of the Week for its critical role in the fragile Xe Champhone and other wetlands in Southeast Asia. Saving the species from the brink of extinction in the wild and restoring its habitat will help ensure a healthy environment and create socio-economic opportunities for the people who depend on the wetlands.

What’s a Fishing Spider? Behind the Arachnid Trending on Facebook

Freshwater Species of the Week: Fishing Spider

When the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources posted on its Facebook page that giant fishing spiders had been spotted around the state the news was shared more than 10,000 times. More than 2,000 comments were received, including from people posting their own images of the arachnids. Many posters expressed concern and abhorrence. But these are amazing animals with super powers, able to walk or sail with the wind on water, and they can haul up aquatic animals five times their weight.

Blind Hoosier Cavefish: Freshwater Species of the Week

As an Indiana Hoosier, I was thrilled to learn of this new species: the Hoosier cavefish (Amblyopsis hoosieri). Described this week, the Hoosier is the first species of cavefish to be named in the U.S. in 40 years, making its entry into the pantheon of known creatures even sweeter. The small, blind fish can grow…

Mexico’s Blind Cave Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

If you don’t use it, you lose it—at least this appears to be the case for a blind cave fish found in Mexico and the southern U.S. known as Astyanax mexicanus. Descended from an eyed surface fish, over long periods of time the subterranean form of the same species has adapted to darkness, accumulating new…

Salmon Trucked to Ocean? Freshwater Species of the Week

The annual fall run of young salmon from their inland birthplaces in rivers to the sea is one of Nature’s dramatic migrations. But this year, a number of chinook salmon may make that journey by truck. This week, state and federal wildlife officials in northern California announced that they will ferry hatchery-raised salmon to the…

Volunteers Needed to Study American Eels

This week, a trio of organizations have asked the public to help gather data on one of New York City’s more slippery residents: the American eel (Anguilla rostrata). (We previously profiled the American eel as a Freshwater Species of the Week in August 2012.) Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium, the New York State Department…

The Mexican “Water Monster” Resurfaces: Freshwater Species of the Week

Feared extinct, another axolotl has been found in Mexico City—but will the amphibian hang on?

Thousands of Baby Turtles Hatch in Brazil: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, scientists in Brazil weren’t kidding when they said that they “hit the mother lode.” They were referring to a mass hatching of an estimated 210,000 giant South American river turtles at the Abufari Biological Reserve. It’s one of the largest known hatchings for the species, Podocnemis expansa. Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society…

First Fish That’s No Longer Endangered: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, for the first time, a fish has been declared recovered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed this week that the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) “has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered species or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.” The silvery…

New Big-Head Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, scientists identified a new species of freshwater fish in the U.S., the cedar sculpin (Cottus schitsuumsh). Forest Service fisheries biologist Michael Young said in a statement, “It’s really exciting to find a new species of fish. It’s something you might expect in more remote parts of the world, but not in the U.S.” Scientists…

New Species of River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

Scientists in Brazil proposed a new species of river dolphin this week, the first such designation for the highly endangered group in a century. The proposed new species of river dolphin, the Araguaian boto (Inia araguaiaensis), was found in the Araguaia River Basin in central Brazil. The marine mammals were found to be isolated from other…

Bird-Snatching Tigerfish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Earlier this week we reported on the first confirmed video that shows what many people had long feared: that some fish can leap out of the water and snatch birds in midair. That fish is the tigerfish, a “megafish” that dwells in lakes in Africa, and which has large, razor-sharp teeth. Widely distributed across much…

Bizarre Mystery Fish Identified: Species of the Week

Earlier this week, an angler in Borneo caught an unusual-looking fish, which caused quite a stir online. Reported the Borneo Post: The mystery fish has a large head and is covered with sharp spines on the top and bottom of its body. Its body gets progressively smaller towards the tail. The fish measuring over one…

New Species of Giant Air-Breathing Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Water Currents previously reported on Donald Stewart‘s ongoing efforts to reclassify a giant Amazonian fish as representing several distinct species. The work of the fish biologist at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) is supported in part by National Geographic. Stewart’s latest work has just been published in the journal Copeia, and marks…

Fish That Lay Eggs Out of the Water: Freshwater Species of the Week

These fish are born out of water.  The fish Copella arnoldi is commonly called the splash tetra or splashing tetra, due to its unique reproductive behavior. That is, it lays its eggs outside of water. It is one of few known species of fish in the world to do so. When a male is ready to mate, it…