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Breadfruit, the Tree of Life for a Hungry Planet

By Diane Ragone, Director of the Breadfruit Institute, National Tropical Botanical Garden

I’ve been interested in breadfruit since I began my graduate work in 1983. I was mainly interested in traditional fruit trees in the Pacific Islands. Then, I wrote a term paper on breadfruit, and I became really interested in its importance to plant diversity and food security.

September 7, 2014: Walking Through Conflict Zones, Driving 200 Miles Per Hour and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway

Rocking lazily in the gentle swell as our floating country of 113 people steams out to the first drill site offers me time to recollect what it takes to finally pull out of port. Stepping aboard this 471-foot ocean drill ship, which flies a Cyprus flag, are 30 scientists hailing from countries such as France,…

Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay: When Partnerships Work

By Bob Vanasse Too often, environmental groups, regulators and fishermen find themselves cast in antagonistic roles on marine issues. Prolonged legal and regulatory battles frequently top headlines, while successful conservation partnerships go unheralded. The Chesapeake Bay, long plagued by problems like pollution and runoff, is benefitting from one such partnership. Regional fishermen, government agencies and environmental…

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

Feeding in the Flinders: Past and Present

Emily Hughes searches for fossils in the romantic expanse of the Australian Outback. Ancient creatures fed 560-million years ago on microbial mat, and today she admires the differences between what creatures ate then and now.

June 22, 2014: Defying Gravity With Our Dog, Stalking Snow Leopards and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we soar with dogs, look for a peaceful resolution to Middle Eastern conflicts, recover lost treasures high in the Andes, save snow leopards, venture to the North Pole for the last time, preach the dangers of cheap meat, rehab injured city critters, and ponder our climate future.

June 1, 2014: Slackline Between Hot Air Balloons, Curing “Invisible Diseases” and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Slacklining…

April 27, 2014: Tragedy on Everest, Rowing Across the Pacific, Wrestling Mongolians and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests reflect on the dangers of climbing Mount Everest after the recent tragedy, row a boat across the oceans and bike across continents to circumnavigate the globe, discover what it is like to be a kid in Mongolia, learn what happened This Weekend In History, detect land mines in Cambodia, travel in style with your dog companion, discover new ways which drug trafficking is cutting down the rainforest, gave through space and time with the world’s most powerful satellite array, and understand why Sherpas climb deadly peaks on Wild Chronicles.

Monarch Butterflies Shrink, Get Paler After Skipping a Meal

Brilliantly colored monarch butterflies literally are what they eat—and missing even one meal can be harmful, a new study says.

March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Mission Blue, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

Bernando LaPallo and the Recipe for a Long Life

Bernando Lapallo plans to celebrate his 113th birthday this year. The supercentenarian resident of Arizona lives to inspire people everywhere that they too can grow old, even very old, if only they live clean and healthy lives. “Bernando continues to shop for himself, cook, bathe, shave without any assistance from anyone to help him in…

Fulbright-National Geographic Fellows Will Shine Spotlight on Critical World Issues

The Department of State and National Geographic share a common interest in ensuring that individuals throughout the world have access to information that serves to break down barriers between people, said Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs Evan Ryan in her remarks at the official signing event of the new Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship. The inaugural fellows will “will shine a spotlight on critical world issues that serve as the themes of this year’s Digital Storytelling program: Biodiversity, Cities, Cultures, Disasters, Energy, Food, Oceans, and Water.”

Bloomberg Sees the Upside of Oceans

By Brett Jenks, CEO of Rare I’ve been waiting so long to say this, I can hardly contain myself: Michael Bloomberg, in his first big philanthropic act since stepping down as mayor of New York City, just announced a five-year, $53M investment called the Vibrant Oceans Initiative. This is good news for the ocean and…