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Is Your Salmon Small Because of Hungry Cavemen?

Stone Age fishermen in northern Spain selected the biggest whoppers, leaving us with a smaller catch, a new study claims.

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund on expedition with iLCP partner, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. Onboard the M/Y Golden Shadow,…

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

Small Caribbean Island Shows Bold Ocean Leadership: Barbuda Overhauls Reef and Fisheries Management for Sustainability

On August 12th, Barbuda Council signed into law a sweeping set of new ocean management regulations that zone their coastal waters, strengthen fisheries management, and establish a network of marine sanctuaries. This comes after seventeen months of extensive community consultation and scientific research supported by the Waitt Institute. With these new policies, the small island…

Palau Plans to Ban Commercial Fishing, Create Enormous Marine Reserve

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown The people of Palau, a small island nation in the northwestern Pacific, have long realized that the health and prosperity of their nation depends on the ocean. Because of this realization, Palauans have always worked to protect their ocean resources.  That’s why Palau has drawn the world’s top scientists…

Healthy Seas and Healthy Communities: The People of Honduras’ Mesoamerican Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) and features the work of our Fellows on iLCP projects and expeditions.  Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Karen…

What’s an Acre of Seagrass Worth? $8,000 in Fish Alone

By Philine zu Ermgassen, postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University and Dr. Mark Spalding, senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy For decades, dire tales of collapsing fish stocks were told, only to fall on deaf ears. Then, in a 2008 report, “Sunken Billions,” the World Bank and the FAO began to couch the problem in entirely…

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

“First Ever” Photos of Rare Albino Marlin

On March 11, an angler hooked a rare fish: a 300-pound albino blue marlin. The animal was released alive, and photos of the encounter may be the first recorded images of an albino blue marlin, according to the Billfish Report. It was about 1 pm, during a charter fishing trip on the 42-foot boat Spanish…

Financing Sustainable Fisheries With Impact Investments

Impact IQ – What’s good for the fish is good for the fishing communities — and for impact investors. That’s the thesis of three new vehicles for investing in sustainable fisheries that will be tested in the Philippines, Chile, and Brazil over the next two years and then offered to investors more broadly. Former New York City…

Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

Supply Chains Are Key to Change for Sustainable Fisheries and Oceans

When we buy seafood, whether it’s salmon, scallops, or sea bass, we may ask where the fish is from or how fresh it is. Is it local? Caught today? Farmed? And we may conjure up an image of a fisherman on the water, but we rarely think about the full path that fish took on…

Electronic Tagging and Tracking Marine Animals Supports Conservation

Understanding and predicting animal movement is important as it is central to establishing effective management and conservation strategies [1]. Until relatively recently, studying the movements and behaviors of highly migratory marine species (turtles, sharks, whales, penguins, seals and billfish) have been challenging due to the logistical and technological constraints of working in aquatic environments. However,…

Forecast: More Vessels Stuck in Antarctic Ice

Just as the Russian vessel Akademik Shokalskiy and the Chinese vessel sent to rescue it were finally dislodged from the ice after being stuck since Christmas Eve, three fishing vessels have followed a United States icebreaker deep into the Ross Sea to access ice-choked fishing grounds that would otherwise be impossible for their vessels to…