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Can Technology End Pirate Fishing?

Last week, a 60-meter Japanese fishing vessel following the Benguela Current northward along the southwest coast of Africa entered Angolan waters, where it remained for some five days before returning to international waters to meet side-by-side with a Japanese reefer vessel. That activity is more than suspicious. Ships don’t just accidentally drift into the exclusive…

Marine Protected Area Increased Fish and Didn’t Hurt Fishers: Study

We’ve covered marine protected areas (MPAs) a lot in Ocean Views. They come in different flavors and can have different goals, although the basic idea is designating part of the ocean with some kind of legal protection against harmful activities like overfishing or drilling for oil. Today, a new study published in Nature Communications found that…

Search & Deploy! Building Trust Through Collaborative Marine Research

By Holly Rindge, California Ocean Science Trust As we sail out of Moss Landing Harbor, there are no familiar sounds of sea lions or crashing waves.  The early morning fog seems to have muted even the seabirds.   The swells are small today, but that is little comfort to my queasy stomach. I’m onboard the F/V Donna…

Fishermen Develop New Business Models to Save Their Communities

Theresa Peterson has been an Alaska fisherman for three decades. During summer break one year in college she went to Homer, Alaska, to work in a cannery. She lived in a tent with friends. But after four days of being cooped up in the factory she decided she wanted to get a job on a…

The Bottom Line: Embracing Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

Fishing for shad on the Potomac River at Fletcher’s Boathouse is a spring tradition for many Washington-area anglers, including me. As a food source for larger fish, birds of prey, and other animals, shad provide a great example of the interconnectedness of nature—which for decades hasn’t received enough attention from fisheries managers. Although we’ve made…

National Ocean Policy Calls for Smart Choices

I recently joined Ocean Conservancy as its new CEO because I believe in one simple but very ambitious premise: the ocean must be at the very center of the key challenge of our time. That challenge is how to meet the enormous resource demands of a rapidly growing global population without destroying the natural systems…

Time for Honduras to End Scuba Diving for Lobster

Statistically, fishing is one of the world’s most dangerous professions and it is hard to imagine what could be worse than scuba diving for lobster along the remote and impoverished Miskito Coast of Honduras and Nicaragua (see Building a Sustainable Lobster Fishery Off Honduras). The dangers of this profession have been graphically documented by NBC News and…

Earth Day Opinion: Helping Coral Ecosystems Survive a Changing Climate

With corals across the globe bleaching due to advancing ocean temperatures, many of the world’s coral reef experts believe these centers of marine biodiversity may become the first casualty of climate change. But while the news on corals has been largely grim, it is not beyond hope.

Fish Goes Year Without Food, Grows Bigger Organs

Dolly Varden trout can expand their organs to more than two times their regular sizes, a new study says.

Plenty Of Fish In The Sea? It’s The Law!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown In the 1990’s many U.S. fisheries found themselves in crisis. The fish they relied on were deeply depleted from decades of getting caught faster than they could reproduce. After years of bitter argument and concerted conservation-group efforts, Congress in 1996 passed a sweeping set of amendments to the federal…

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Investigating Clues for Great Lakes Conservation Efforts

The Great Lakes are the largest supply of freshwater in the world, and more than 36 million people depend on them for drinking water. As a result, monitoring and maintaining the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem is an urgent priority. Of the diverse organisms inhabiting freshwater systems, fishes are familiar to scientists and laypeople…

Warming Lakes: Climate Change Threatens the Ecological Stability of Lake Tanganyika

Tropical lakes in East Africa don’t grab headlines the way polar bears do, but climate change is having an effect on them, too. Although the changes are not as visible as melting polar ice caps, they are no less real. As in many lakes around the world, water temperature is on the rise in Lake…

MPAs for Fish Fillets: A Double-take on Indonesian Fisheries Management

The two whale sharks turned around to face me, opened their huge mouths and sieved the water filled with tiny baby anchovies. I had to tell myself that they would not bite, but I also remembered these are sharks, not whales and moved out of their path to avoid getting bumped into. It was the…

Overfishing in Indonesia? What Do You Mean: I Don’t See Any Fishers!

Yes, I am lucky. I have been able to sail the waters of Eastern Indonesia over nearly 20 years, and I have dipped underwater, swimming around some incredible lagoons, reefs, and seamounts. When people ask me where to see some remote coasts I say, go anywhere east. Staring at a coastline from a boat anywhere…

Chile Becomes First Country to Protect All Seamounts From Bottom Trawling

  By Alex Muñoz of Oceana I’m happy to start 2013 by sharing some inspiring news from my country, Chile, one of the world’s top fishing nations. The good news is that our Government and National Congress, following campaigning by Oceana, overhauled our fishing laws by banning bottom trawling in all vulnerable marine ecosystems (including…