National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for fisheries

Who Wants to Bring Back Overfishing?

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. Reading headlines about the declining state of the world’s fisheries is enough to turn any carnivore to a steady diet of beef, pork, and chicken. But the reality is, particularly here in America, regulators and fishermen have done an admirable job ending the practice of overfishing and made…

Protecting Coral Reefs, From the FL Keys to the Savu Sea

By Rob Brumbaugh, Integrated Ocean Management Lead, The Nature Conservancy I’ve just returned from Bali, Indonesia, where I spent three weeks working with The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia marine program, and attending an international conference of scientists and economists exploring ways to make the human benefits of nature more apparent to policy makers and stakeholders everywhere. …

Establish the National Endowment for the Oceans

This post originally was originally published by the Center for American Progress. Politico reported last week that Congress seems to be done legislating for 2013. While such an outcome wouldn’t be shocking for an anemic legislative body with a 9 percent approval rating that spends more time talking about a broken website than its own…

MPAs for Fish Fillets in the Coral Triangle (2)

A recent Asia Development Bank report estimates that some 4.9 million people work as fishers across a selection of the Asia Pacific region (the Coral Triangle countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor L’Este). Between 2007 and 2009, seafood constituted approximately 20 percent of the animal protein consumed in Coral Triangle…

Innovating the Business of Seafood for Communities & Health

By Amanda Nagai Certifications and barcode trackers can help shoppers identify seafood at the fish counter, but for consumers who really want to know what they’re eating, the real key may be genuine relationships with the people who hauled in the catch. From Alaska to San Francisco to Boston, conservationist Native Americans, seafood entrepreneurs, and nonprofit…

Fukushima Fallout Not Affecting U.S.-Caught Fish

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. In recent weeks, there has been a significant uptick in news from Fukushima, Japan. Officials from the Japanese government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, admitted that radioactive water is still leaking from the nuclear plant crippled by the 2011 earthquake and…

Can Technology End Pirate Fishing?

Last week, a 60-meter Japanese fishing vessel following the Benguela Current northward along the southwest coast of Africa entered Angolan waters, where it remained for some five days before returning to international waters to meet side-by-side with a Japanese reefer vessel. That activity is more than suspicious. Ships don’t just accidentally drift into the exclusive…

Marine Protected Area Increased Fish and Didn’t Hurt Fishers: Study

We’ve covered marine protected areas (MPAs) a lot in Ocean Views. They come in different flavors and can have different goals, although the basic idea is designating part of the ocean with some kind of legal protection against harmful activities like overfishing or drilling for oil. Today, a new study published in Nature Communications found that…

Search & Deploy! Building Trust Through Collaborative Marine Research

By Holly Rindge, California Ocean Science Trust As we sail out of Moss Landing Harbor, there are no familiar sounds of sea lions or crashing waves.  The early morning fog seems to have muted even the seabirds.   The swells are small today, but that is little comfort to my queasy stomach. I’m onboard the F/V Donna…

Fishermen Develop New Business Models to Save Their Communities

Theresa Peterson has been an Alaska fisherman for three decades. During summer break one year in college she went to Homer, Alaska, to work in a cannery. She lived in a tent with friends. But after four days of being cooped up in the factory she decided she wanted to get a job on a…

The Bottom Line: Embracing Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

Fishing for shad on the Potomac River at Fletcher’s Boathouse is a spring tradition for many Washington-area anglers, including me. As a food source for larger fish, birds of prey, and other animals, shad provide a great example of the interconnectedness of nature—which for decades hasn’t received enough attention from fisheries managers. Although we’ve made…

National Ocean Policy Calls for Smart Choices

I recently joined Ocean Conservancy as its new CEO because I believe in one simple but very ambitious premise: the ocean must be at the very center of the key challenge of our time. That challenge is how to meet the enormous resource demands of a rapidly growing global population without destroying the natural systems…

Time for Honduras to End Scuba Diving for Lobster

Statistically, fishing is one of the world’s most dangerous professions and it is hard to imagine what could be worse than scuba diving for lobster along the remote and impoverished Miskito Coast of Honduras and Nicaragua (see Building a Sustainable Lobster Fishery Off Honduras). The dangers of this profession have been graphically documented by NBC News and…

Earth Day Opinion: Helping Coral Ecosystems Survive a Changing Climate

With corals across the globe bleaching due to advancing ocean temperatures, many of the world’s coral reef experts believe these centers of marine biodiversity may become the first casualty of climate change. But while the news on corals has been largely grim, it is not beyond hope.

Fish Goes Year Without Food, Grows Bigger Organs

Dolly Varden trout can expand their organs to more than two times their regular sizes, a new study says.