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The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef…

Longtime Sea Urchin Diving Partners Lead the Way in Sea Kelp Restoration, Technology and Collaboration

By Leanne Weiss Terry Herzik (67), Gary Thompson (71), and Lucy, Gary’s 8-year-old Chihuahua, board the Sunstar at dawn with enough food and fuel for the next three days. As they pull away, in their 34-foot vessel the sun is just beginning to rise over Fish Harbor, in San Pedro, Los Angeles. They’ll head southwest…

The Global Status of Sharks

Hunter S. Thompson once wrote “It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.” While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Purple Frogs, Taming Zebras

Why aren’t zebras domesticated? How do fish sense danger? Get the answers in this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions column.

Mythical ‘Sea Serpent’ Comes into the Light

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Davy Jones’ Locker, it might be called, this final resting place of a sea serpent.  In a darkened back room at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum Support Center in Suitland, Maryland, ichthyologists Jeff Williams and Kris Murphy prepare to break the seal of a time capsule, a faded jar the color of yellow-green sea glass. A container…

Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay: When Partnerships Work

By Bob Vanasse Too often, environmental groups, regulators and fishermen find themselves cast in antagonistic roles on marine issues. Prolonged legal and regulatory battles frequently top headlines, while successful conservation partnerships go unheralded. The Chesapeake Bay, long plagued by problems like pollution and runoff, is benefitting from one such partnership. Regional fishermen, government agencies and environmental…

Green Snails: Valuable Aliens

By Alison Barrat and Alex Dempsey You don’t have to look too far to find a horror story about an invasive species that has completely disrupted a natural ecosystem. Cane toads in Australia come to mind or pythons in the Everglades or even lionfish in the Caribbean.  But what about introductions that have gone well?…

Local Leaders Restoring Fishing Economy and Ocean Health

By: Michael Bell, Oceans Program Director, The Nature Conservancy in California The best way to protect our oceans is by empowering local communities and fishermen that have the most to gain from sustainable fisheries.  The Nature Conservancy and its partners have tested this theory by partnering with local fishing communities to take charge of the waters…

A Chance to Save Our Oceans, and Save Lives

By Michael R. Bloomberg and César Gaviria More than three billion people around the world depend on fish for food or income, and that number is rising even as the supply of fish is falling. The amount of fish caught peaked in the 1990s and has dropped by eight percent since, because there are fewer…

Healthy Seas and Healthy Communities: The People of Honduras’ Mesoamerican Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) and features the work of our Fellows on iLCP projects and expeditions.  Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Karen…

June 8, 2014: Diving From 90 Feet Above Havana Bay, Free the Dancing Bears and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they run for peace through the Middle East, honor hero war dogs, play matchmaker for dolphins, safely cycle through crowded city streets, pick the perfect outdoor gear, dive from 90 foot cliffs competitively, recover a 500 year old sunken ship, farm the planet’s oceans, and save a species and a community at the same time.

How Catfish Stalk Prey in the Dark

Catfish searching for prey in the dark detect slight chemical changes in the water produced by the breath of a sea worm, a new study says.

Blind Hoosier Cavefish: Freshwater Species of the Week

As an Indiana Hoosier, I was thrilled to learn of this new species: the Hoosier cavefish (Amblyopsis hoosieri). Described this week, the Hoosier is the first species of cavefish to be named in the U.S. in 40 years, making its entry into the pantheon of known creatures even sweeter. The small, blind fish can grow…

Restoration Week: Celebrating Science in Action and the Value of Ocean Habitat

Rob Brumbaugh, senior marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy June 1st marks the opening of the Atlantic hurricane season and as a resident of the Florida Keys I know to take every storm seriously and prepare accordingly. Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted a “near-normal or below-normal 2014 Atlantic hurricane season,” and while…