National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for extinct

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.

Recognizing the Renosterveld: Biodiversity in Peril

National Geographic Young Explorer Evan Eifler is working to preserve the unique ecosystems of South Africa, most notably the renosterveld. In this post, he explains what renosterveld is and why biomes in South Africa are so unique on a world-wide scale and why they are critical to preserve.

The Top of the IUCN Red List

The 61 Most-Threatened Species: Identifying a definitive list of the most threatened species is a difficult and sensitive exercise. Although lists are popular and useful, a comprehensive list of the Most Threatened Species depends on what you think makes a species most at risk of extinction and could conceivable contain all 4,286 Critically Endangered species…

Resurrecting the New Zealand Jesus Bird

The ‘Jesus bird’ is the unique name given to storm petrels, small seabirds of the family Hydrobatidae, for their characteristic ability to ‘walk’ on water. Storm petrels are remarkable creatures. With a body-weight about the same as a house sparrow, these seabirds can live for up to 30 years, and feed in the remote pelagic…

Extinct “Devil Frog” Sported Spikes, Body Armor

Sporting elaborate spikes and body armor, the extinct amphibian was even more terrifying than previously thought, a new study says.

Biologists Find “Extinct” Andean Toad Alive and Well

A rare toad species long thought extinct turns up in an Ecuadorian forest.

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

September 8, 2013: Paddling Through Russia’s Remotest Rivers, Playing Matchmaker for Rhinos, and More

Join us this week, as we paddle 3,000 miles through the remotest rivers in Mongolia and Russia, try to help in Syria’s civil war by starting a children’s camp for refugees, create a dating game for rhinos, film Africa’s disappearing megafauna, and ride hogs across the United States.

Top 10 Headlines Today: ‘Extinct’ Snake Discovered, Test-Tube Baby Born…

The top stories on National Geographic’s radar today: Scientists have re-discovered a snake once considered extinct, a baby has been born after it was selected using new genome screening techniques, and…

Top 10 Headlines Today: Mind-Controlled Flight, Dead Fish Have Kids…

The top stories on our radar today: Researchers have flown a robot using only their minds, guppy dads can have offspring even after death, and…

Bats, Vultures and Owls Face More Tricks than Treats

As children prepare for their beloved Halloween trick-or-treat ritual, nature is playing tricks of its own with some of our autumnal holiday’s winged icons. Two expert conservationists with the Wildlife Conservation Society argue that to protect bats, owls, and vultures perhaps it’s time to give them some treats in the form of environmental and habitat protection.

Weird & Wild: Well-Endowed Frog Found

By Christine Dell’Amore In case you haven’t had your fill of genitalia news for the week, the Nature Conservancy is reporting the discovery of a new population of well-endowed frogs in California. The conservation nonprofit’s Larry Serpa, an aquatic ecologist, found the coastal tailed frog living in the Garcia River Forest (see map)–21 miles (34…