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A Week of Wanderings in Thailand

Justine Jackson-Ricketts is an National Geographic Young Explorer studying a rare and elusive species of dolphin called the Irrawaddy dolphin. By taking a closer look at their diet, Justine can help determine whether or not Irrawaddy dolphins eat the same types of fish, squid, and crustaceans caught by fisheries in the Gulf of Thailand. This will…

NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

Video: Wild Cats of the Forest

Victoria Hillman is a National Geographic Explorer and Research Director for the Transylvanian Wildlife Project overseeing research on carnivores and biodiversity of Europe’s last great wilderness. Follow the expedition here on Explorers Journal through updates from the team. —–— The Carpathian mountains are home to two species of wild cat, the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) and the European…

Audio Story: To Walk Into the Storm

(Audio Story) “You are privileged to walk this.” It’s amazing how such a simple statement ripped me apart. Give me rain, wind, and hail — I’ll persist! But what happens when I can’t answer why I persist?

As a National Geographic Young Explorer, Jay walked over 400 miles in the mountains of South Africa, completing the first trek of the entire Rim of Africa Mountain Trail, to help educate South African youth on the Cape Floristic Region and conservation through the story of creating Africa’s first Mega-Trail.

Hōkūle‘a – Getting Ready for the Voyage of a Lifetime

The Polynesian Voyaging Society in Hawai’i is preparing to set sail around the world aboard two traditionally designed voyaging canoes. Read more to learn: what the voyage is about, where we plan to sail to, and why we are going.

Bringing Classrooms into the Wilderness

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species.  —- A huge part of my organization’s mission is to promote conservation around the world.…

Help Save Our Oceans from Plastic Debris

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species.  —- When paddler, filmmaker and Steve Weileman bottled his first sample of sea water off a remote,…

Saving the Big Cats of Central Mozambique

It wasn’t too long ago that Central Mozambique was considered lost territory for the big cats, a place where they would soon no longer roam wild and free. But today an effort is underway to hold the line against extinction and ensure that the African lion has its rightful place here into the foreseeable future.  This thanks…

Severe Erosion Reveals Earth’s Treasures

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

The Surprising Power of “Sentiment” in International Work

“You’ve got to learn”, my research assistant Arun told me a few weeks into the project, “everything here works on sentiment”. It has taken me a while to realize what he meant by this, but he’s right. Hourly buses and trains can be hours late and power cuts stop to night-time work, but your friends don’t fail you.

Courting Death by Cold Water

I hate cold water. I always have. I have never liked like cold swimming pools or swimming holes, no matter how hot the outside temperatures were. When I moved to Alaska, my dislike of cold water grew. I learned that is was possibly the most dangerous thing in the state, more dangerous than the bears or avalanches. Cold water was an unforgiving killer and I swore to avoid it as much as possible.

Rainforest Bugs and Best Wishes for 2014!

I have been exploring the Kakamega Forest in Western Kenya over the last few days. The forest is sparkling with life after the heavy rains from earlier this month. It has been wonderful taking long quiet walks in the forest to look at insects and birds and ponder the meaning of life. Here are a…

A Christmas of the Coastal Kind

What made this Christmas so special wasn’t at all a particular tradition or exotic celebration of any notable kind. Instead, it was simply a continuation of business-as-usual, another day in a life where the sea gives only to the extent that one shows up. So on this year’s Christmas day, everyone showed up as they did yesterday, as they will tomorrow, and as they will for every other day of the year.

Festive Slovenia Welcomes the Holidays with Mulled Wine

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the Erased of Slovenia- 200,000 non-ethnic Slovenian residents who were not automatically granted citizenship after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991. Over two decades later, the community is still fighting for documentation. These stories are about the Erased and the places they live.  —- Expedition Journal: Izbrisani…

Two Emerging Explorers – Kindred Spirits Living Half a World Apart

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species. In that spirit, his blog posts appear both here on Explorers Journal and in Beyond the Edge, the…