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Tag archives for Explorer-in-Residence

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

Testing the Genetic Diversity of College Students in New York City

Two-hundred university students trudged through the snowy New York City streets to swab their cheeks and trace their ancient ancestry with the Genographic Project on Monday evening at the American Museum of Natural History. Students from over eight local Universities were given the unique opportunity to test their DNA with the Geno 2.0 DNA Ancestry…

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

New Caledonia Expedition: An Army of Giant Parrotfish

Today we dove at Astrolabe Reef, a remote coral atoll northeast of New Caledonia. So far it’s the best place we have explored. In our dives today we’ve seen everything one hopes to see: sharks, groupers, Napoleon wrasse, bright red old sea fans, and many other gorgeous animals. But the most impressive sight – and…

October 6, 2013: Throwing Axes Like a Lumberjack, Wolves Feeding Grizzlies, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we row through a quickly thawing Northwest Passage, then we throw axes with a champion lumberjack, and finally, we snap pictures with National Geographic’s head of photography.

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

DNA Research Reveals Uros People of Peru and Bolivia to Have Distinctive Genetic Ancestries

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project team shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

Desventuradas Expedition: The Importance of Being Here

Vice President of Oceana, South America Alex Muñoz Wilson weighs in on the incredible work being done at Desventuradas and the effect it will likely have on the future of conservation in Chile.

Desventuradas Expedition: Where Giant Lobsters Roam

The team discovers a robust population of lobsters weighing over 15 pounds!

Desventuradas Expedition: A Surprise Stowaway

Enric Sala and cinematographer Manu San Félix meet a particularly friendly lobster while exploring an underwater kelp forest.

Hangout with Sylvia Earle at the Undersea Laboratory, Aquarius

In case you missed it, we hung out with Sylvia Earle and fellow Aquanauts at Aquarius Reef Base. Enjoy!

Facebook Live Special Event: Your Questions for a Deep Sea Explorer

In an unprecedented FB Live Event, Ocean Explorer, Enric Sala will be calling in for an interview via satelitte phone from the remote Pitcairn Islands. Join us for a live conversation on the National Geographic Facebook page Wednesday, March 28 at 2:30pm ET (7:30pm UTC). Post your questions there or in the comments section of this blog post. Then tune in for the live interview and post more questions as the conversation develops.

Robert Ballard: Titanic’s Titan

Bob Ballard will forever go down in history as the one who discovered the Titanic. But to Bob, finding the Titanic was more than just a scientific challenge. It was a humbling experience that left him with a deep connection and quiet respect for a ship and all its passengers.

National Geographic Live with the World Premiere of “Turkana”

The world premiere of Bones of Turkana will be screened at National Geographic Auditorium on March 19 at 7:30 PM, followed by a discussion with the director and producers. Co-presented by the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital.

Adios Coiba! Until Next Time.

With the conclusion of Sylvia Earle’s fifth and final day at Isla Coiba Marine Park, the expedition team wraps up their adventure with a renewed sense of optimism for the future of the park and all of its marine inhabitants.