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Space Exploration Dollars Dwarf Ocean Spending

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. “Star Trek” would have us believe that space is the final frontier, but with apologies to the armies of Trekkies, their oracle might be a tad off base. Though we know little about outer space, we still have plenty of frontiers to explore here…

Exploring the Ghosts of Wrangel Island

The history of Russia’s Wrangel Island is as dramatic and rugged as the island itself.  The tragic 1913 Canadian Arctic Expedition and the equally tragic 1921 Wrangel Island Expedition were just two episodes from the island’s history as a holy grail of sorts for Arctic explorers. They were also the subjects of my first two…

Yeti Robot Detects Polar Dangers

This battery-powered rover has all the toughness of an abominable snowman, surveying undetected hazards at scientific-research sites in Greenland and Antarctica.

James Cameron Gives DEEPSEA CHALLENGER Sub to Woods Hole

Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron made history one year ago when he became the first person to reach the bottom of the ocean by himself, in his high-tech sub DEEPSEA CHALLENGER (learn all about the groundbreaking project on the official website). To mark the one-year anniversary of that voyage, Cameron has now announced…

Fighting for the Last Tomato: Surviving a Field Season in Antarctica

By Cassandra Brooks and John Weller Things are getting desperate. The last of the browning lettuce disappeared unannounced weeks ago. The bananas barely made it through the first few meals. Our days of eating fresh mangoes, pineapple, tricolored bell peppers, cucumbers, radishes, and avocado (oh the delicious avocado!) are all gone. The last tomato –…

Seven Friends, Two Days, and One Beautiful Trail-less Valley

After six hours of bushwhacking up a trail-less mountain side, Marty and Ross come upon a breathtaking sight- the Northern Patagonian Ice Field.

Geography in the News: The Races to the Pole

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM  and Maps.com A little more than 100 years ago, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole. While the feat was an amazing story in itself, the races that preceded it to reach the southernmost point on the Earth are even more fascinating—and heartbreaking.…

Lessons from a Little Yellow Submarine

On a foggy night, a little yellow submarine is docked in Monterey Bay. The research submersible is about to introduce a group of young people to a whole new world and possibly a new line of work.  Youth Radio’s Denise Tejada went along for the ride.   Chris Randolph and Bailey Da Costa are juniors…

Rolex Awards for Enterprise Names 2012 Young Laureates

Swiss watchmaker Rolex announced five awards for Young Laureates at a press conference in New Delhi, India, today “to encourage leadership and excellence in the next generation and to acknowledge a surge of applications from young people for the Rolex Awards for Enterprise this year.”

George Kennan: An Investigative Reporter Who Helped Found the National Geographic Society

Asked once where he was educated, George Kennan supposedly replied, “Russia.” That one word sufficed, for he was not quite 20 years old when he decided to make his first journey there, a journey that resulted in his first book, in a series of difficult assignments in dangerous places, and in his being a founder of the National Geographic Society. From the horrors of the Russian prison system to the volcanic destruction of Martinique, Kennan was one of the pre-eminent globetrotting journalists of his day–one who wrote with such authority that his words have had far-reaching impact.

Gilbert Thompson, Lying Bob, and the Ballad of Croppy the Mule

When National Geographic founder Gilbert Thompson enlisted in the Union Army, a clerical error identified him as a painter instead of a printer. The typo proved to be serendipitous, leading to his work as an engineer, then a cartographer, and then on to a lifetime of adventures as he explored and surveyed the western United States.

Patagonian Fjords Expedition: Cold Water Corals

Follow along as NG Grantee Rhian Waller explores the little known world of corals that dwell in the fjords of South America.

Curiosity Landing on Mars Greeted with Whoops and Tears of Jubilation

Breaking Orbit guest blogger Marc Kaufman describes the joyful atmosphere, relief and pride inside the NASA Jet Propulsion Jet Laboratory a few hours ago, when scientists, engineers and technicians got confirmation from Mars that after years of hard work and a nail-biting descent their roving science laboratory Curiosity had been placed on the Red Planet apparently exactly as planned.

Mission to Mars: Why Curiosity’s Landing is a Moment to Savor

By dropping the one-ton rover Curiosity into a Martian crater (with a three-mile high mountain nearby!), and equipping it to search over two years for the building blocks of possible extraterrestrial life; humans are once again at a great moment of adventure and exploration to savor.

Searching For Sunken Treasure, Discovering a DIY Community

When James Cameron plunged to the bottom of the Marina Trench in his sleek, $8 million submarine, it heralded a new age of underwater exploration. But the deep sea isn’t the only aquatic frontier left to explore. Around the world, there are countless undersea caves, flooded mine shafts and other underwater tight spots that have remained off limits to divers because they’re too narrow or dangerous to navigate. And happily, the right craft for the job probably isn’t a multi-million-dollar submersible, but something so accessible you can make it yourself.