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How “Walking” Fish Made the Leap From Ocean to Land

The Pacific leaping blenny went from swimmer to landlubber by evolving camouflage to blend into surrounding rocks, a new study says.

A New Species of Wild Cat Found Prowling Brazilian Forests and Grasslands

Hiding in plain sight, researchers have discovered that a wild cat called the tigrina is actually two separate species.

Could Mockingjays From “The Hunger Games” Exist One Day?

Besides fire, the overwhelming symbol of this weekend’s blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, is of a steel-colored, mohawked bird with a pointed, hummingbird-like bill who trills melodiously. Mockingjays are described as a cross between mockingbirds and “jabberjays,” a species developed by the Panem government to imitate human speech and spy on the rebels.…

First Peek Into Cave System Holding New Hominid Fossils

As the camp gets set up, the caver/scientists get geared up, and I get psyched up, seeing hints of early hominids in the everyday things we do.

Male Lizards Less Attracted to “Bearded Ladies”

When it comes to choosing a mate, male lizards tend to go for more “feminine” females without blue necks, a new study says.

New Species of Spiny Rat Found in Indonesia

Researchers discover this newest member of the rodent family, sporting spiky brown fur and a stubby tail, on the Maluku islands of Indonesia.

A Colorful View of Incredibly Sticky Feet

National Geographic grantee Travis Hagey reveals the secrets of geckos’ super-powers, and opens wide the doors of worldwide gecko diversity.

Masters of Deception: 5 Two-Faced Species

A spider with a happy face on its back, an orchid that looks like a monkey, and a bug with a peanut head are among nature’s tricksters.

Frog Hears With Its Mouth, Surprises Scientists

A tiny island frog makes do without an inner ear by using its mouth—a new hearing strategy not known before in nature, scientists say.

August 25, 2013: Running Ultramarathons at 18,000 Feet, Meeting Captive Killer Whales, and More

This week, join us as we run a 137-mile race 18,000 feet above sea level, then we meet beach-dwelling wolves that fish for salmon like bears (and occasionally harass humans), and finally, we learn about the SeaWorld orca who has been connected with three human deaths to appreciate how hard the large, social mammals are to maintain in captivity.

August 11, 2013: Holding our Breath in Underwater Caves, Biking Across Kyrgyzstan Mountains, and More

Join us this week, as we explore the labyrinth of underwater caves deep under Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula for clues of its Mayan past, cycle solo through Central Asian mountain passes to climb remote peaks, and debunk American historical myths from the Wild West to the Surfin’ Safari.

Hero Shrew Found, One of “Most Bizarre Animals on Earth”

Watch out, Mighty Mouse: Scientists have found a new species of shrew with superhero strength and the oddest backbone of the animal kingdom.

July 21, 2013: Swimming From Cuba to Florida, Developing Deep Sea Diving Suits, and More

This week, join us as we attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida and meet a surprisingly potent form of jellyfish, then we listen to glaciers as they melt and learn what they’re telling us, and we hear protest songs from an indigenous Australian country singer.

What Can Sexy Robot Frogs Teach Us About Evolution?

Researchers use sexy robot frogs to gain insight into the evolution of complex behaviors.

3 Mammals That “Choose” Their Babies’ Sex

A new study says mammals can “choose” the sex of their offspring—does that include us?