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Obama May Use Executive Power to Forge International Climate Change Deal as U.N. Draft Report Paints Stark Climate Picture

A leaked draft of a report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that global warming is already affecting all continents and that additional pollution from heat-trapping gases will worsen the situation. “Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the…

Washington, D.C.’s Snowy Owl Found Dead in Minnesota

A snowy owl that ventured out of the Arctic and into Washington D.C. this past winter dies in Minnesota.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

Court Ruling Could Affect Nation’s Electric Grid

Editor’s Note: While Tim Profeta is on vacation, Jeremy Tarr, policy associate in the Climate and Energy Program at Duke’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, will author The Climate Post. Tim will post again August 28. A unanimous ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit could change the way utilities and regulators consider electricity…

13 Things You Probably Don’t Know About the U.S. Water System (But Should)

  It’s been a rough year for the U.S. water system already, and it’s only summer. Two U.S. cities (Charleston, West Virginia, and Toledo, Ohio) have gone for days with no safe water service. The nation’s largest reservoir is lower than it’s ever been. The nation’s largest state is in the worst drought ever recorded.…

Big Cats at a Tipping Point in the Wild, Jouberts Warn

With lions, leopards, and other big cat species on a downward spiral, we sit at a tipping point when it comes to the conservation of some of the world’s most iconic animals. That’s the perspective of Dereck and Beverly Joubert, distinguished wildlife documentarians and conservationists. The pair have spent decades in the wilds of Africa, following lions…

Unexpected Conservation Connection Between Montana, Azerbaijan and the United Arab Emirates

My wife Kayla and I, after decades of living in Montana, made a rookie mistake last month as we tried, on a week’s notice, to secure a three-night spot at one of our favorite camping areas. We figured the second week of July would be a perfect time for relaxing and wildlife watching. Apparently so…

Report, Initiatives Aim to Take Action on Climate Change

Editor’s Note: While Tim Profeta is on vacation, Jeremy Tarr, policy associate in the Climate and Energy Program at Duke’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, will author The Climate Post. Tim will post again August 28. A new report from the White House Council of Economic Advisers finds that for each decade of delay, policy actions on climate…

Rule for Regulating Existing Power Plants under Fire

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee during a hearing on “EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standards for Existing Power Plants.” Debate about the proposed rule to regulate carbon emissions from existing power plants has swirled since the rule’s release last month. Coal-heavy states and others have criticized both the…

How the West was Lost

Just as the settling and development of the arid American West was fueled by harnessing its available fresh water, the growing lack of water availability may well be its undoing. California’s epic drought is just the latest example of what is shaping up to be the new normal out west.  Last year was the driest…

Green Snails: Valuable Aliens

By Alison Barrat and Alex Dempsey You don’t have to look too far to find a horror story about an invasive species that has completely disrupted a natural ecosystem. Cane toads in Australia come to mind or pythons in the Everglades or even lionfish in the Caribbean.  But what about introductions that have gone well?…

White House Announces New Climate Change Initiatives

The White House on Wednesday announced executive actions to help states and communities build their resilience to more intense storms, high heat, sea level rise, and other effects of climate change. The actions, which involve several federal agencies, were among the recommendations by the president’s State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience. “…Climate…

China and U.S. Sign Pacts on Climate Change

The world’s two largest carbon emitters have signed pacts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The deals—actually eight projects demonstrating smart grids and carbon capture, utilization and storage—were made through the China-U.S. Climate Change Working Group and will involve companies and research bodies. “The significance of these two nations coming together can’t be understated,” said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the…

Q&A: Inside the Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking in Brazil

Conservation biologist Juliana Machado Ferriera talks about her work to halt illegal wildlife trade in Brazil, which affects nearly 40 million animals each year.

Supreme Court Says EPA Can Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions

In the latest decision on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to regulate carbon pollution, the U.S. Supreme Court reaffirmed EPA’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act, but voted 5-4 to limit permitting requirements. The ruling does not directly affect the EPA’s latest proposed rule to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, and…