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March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

March 9, 2014: Racing the Iditarod With Twins, Time Traveling to a Black Hole and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they ride 1,000 miles across Alaskan wilderness with a pack of dogs, hike quickly down the Appalachian Trail, lower scientists into sinkholes on tepuis, program robots to do household chores but not enslave the human race, break free of time on the edge of a black hole, be persecuted for our science, grow organic underwear, and explain evolution to children.

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

by Kevin Schafer / iLCP No, this is not your average raccoon.  And that, precisely, is the point of this story.  For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

Biologists Find “Extinct” Andean Toad Alive and Well

A rare toad species long thought extinct turns up in an Ecuadorian forest.

New Study: 1 in 4 Sharks and Rays Threatened With Extinction

The future for sea animals looks pretty grim. And, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), it will only get worse unless action is taken to conserve sharks and rays. A new global study released this week predicts that a quarter of chondrichthyan fishes—sharks, rays, and chimaeras—are threatened with extinction. The study,…

Rare Saola, Dubbed “Asian Unicorn,” Sighted for First Time in 21st Century

Camera traps have captured images of a saola, an antelope-like mammal often referred to as the “Asian unicorn,” in the forests of Vietnam. This incredibly rare species was last seen in the wild 14 years ago, and has only been known to science since 1992.

Top 10 Headlines Today: Ice-Free Arctic, Rare Reptiles Stolen…

The top stories on National Geographic’s radar today: A study says the Arctic could be ice free by 2054, at least 23 rare animals have been stolen from a zoo in Australia, and…

Top 10 Headlines Today: Telescopic Contact Lens, Australian Skull Mystery…

A roundup of the top 10 stories on National Geographic’s radar today: The world’s first “zooming” contact lens has been invented, the discovery of an ancient white man’s skull in Australia could rewrite history, and …

Best Rare-Bird Pictures of 2012 Named

In an international competition, photographers competed to capture pictures of the world’s rarest birds.

Endangered “Demon Primate” Genome Sequenced

According to local legends in Madagascar, the aye-aye lemur is a demon that can kill just by pointing a finger. That sounds mythical, but for insects inside tree trunks, there is truth to the killing part. The nocturnal aye-aye uses its multipurpose middle finger to tap forest wood in search of its meals (see above…

Rescuing South Africa’s Endangered Cape Parrot…

As with most wild parrots, the story of the Cape parrot of South Africa, is a tale of people and parrot over many generations… We have been fascinated by parrots, their colors, characters and voices. for thousands of years. A longtime ago in prehistory the ancestors of today’s Cape parrot Poicephalus robustus specialized their behavior…

A “Doomsday Virus” for Endangered Parrots?

Every time we test blood from new endangered parrot species with small, isolated wild populations, we find Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD) virus, a particularly nasty airborne circovirus that destroys the skin and feathers while opening large, painful fissures in the beak that eventually breaks it apart. Cape parrots, black-cheeked lovebirds, Carnaby’s cockatoos, New Caledonian parakeets,…

Plain Wonderful: Grasslands News from September

[Fall light show on American Prairie Reserve. Photo: Dennis Lingohr]   Are prairie landscapes loved the least? Grasslands are the least protected ecosystem in the world despite the fact that they cover a quarter of the Earth’s surface. Some might say they are the least sexy, too. After all, can grasses really compete with dramatic…

August 19, 2012: Breaking World Records, Jamming to Rusted Root, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we cycle around the world in 92 days, capture snow leopards in Afghanistan, meet Boyd’s radio doppelgangers, take the world’s temperature, send a touring jam band on their way, hike North America, sail across Melanesia navigating by the stars, and dig up China’s ethnically diverse history.