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Ferrets In the Night – Recovery Efforts Continue for Masked Bandits in Montana

The region of the American Prairie Reserve encompasses two national wildlife refuges. This is an area of Montana with dramatic cliffs cut by the Missouri River and rugged, wooded terrain housing mountain lions, elk and big horn sheep. As you move up from the river and north across the prairie, an expansive network of ecologically…

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

Scenes from the Philippines: Post-earthquake, Post-typhoon

Guest blog by Dr. Amanda Vincent, Director and Co-founder of Project Seahorse  It’s been an incredibly difficult few weeks for the central Philippines. Following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake last month that caused considerable loss of lives and homes, the Visayas region was hit on Nov. 7th by Typhoon Haiyan (a.k.a. Yolanda), one of the very strongest…

Steve Winter’s Journey to Tigers Forever

This week, wildlife photojournalist Steve Winter’s story about cougars appears in the December issue of National Geographic. He’s become the big cat guy—it’s the fourth species he’s covered for the magazine. This is a also a big week for him and me: our new book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat, published…

The Hidden World of Mozambique’s Sky Island Forests

PROJECT UPDATE: Civil unrest in Mozambique for the first time in 21 years has brought threat of civil war. We are therefore postponing the field work until February in the hopes that things will be settled and the roads passable by then.

Purring Monkey? Flamboyant Lizard? New Amazonian Species Are Totally Wild

More than 400 shiny new species, ones completely unknown to science, have turned up in the Amazon rain forest, according to the latest report from the WWF.

Why I Don’t Eat Most Canned Tuna Anymore

Recently, legendary explorer and tireless ocean protector Dr. Sylvia Earle said something that caused me to rethink the kinds of seafood I put on my family’s dinner table. Dr. Earle and her colleagues at Mission Blue fly with LightHawk to gain a big picture perspective of the ocean surface, to inform their work to protect…

Walking for Elephants: One Conservationist’s Journey

Jim Nyamu, a 37-year-old Kenyan research scientist, finished his 560-mile walk in Washington, D.C., last week to raise awareness about threats to elephants in the wild. He spoke to a gathering of about a hundred people in Lafayette Park opposite the White House. His finish was timed to coincide with the International March for Elephants,…

The Impact of Energy Development on the Environment: A Look at Wildlife with Dr. Michael Hutchins

As much as I was awed by the poverty-stricken nation of India on a recent visit, and what many westerners would consider deplorable conditions, I was impressed by the country’s “green movement,” which is rapidly emerging on the subcontinent. South Asia’s largest nation will soon surpass China as the most populated country in the world—a…

Elephant Crisis: An International March, As Warning and Call to Action

Elephants have captured the imagination of individuals across the world. Majestic beings, they have enthralled even those who may never have enjoyed close contact with them. It’s this empathy that has led thousands of people worldwide today to join the International March for Elephants organized by iworry, a campaign by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, to sound the warning that the future survival of elephants is in serious jeopardy. By Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the conservation charity.

Al Shabaab and the Human Toll of the Illegal Ivory Trade

The real boon for Al Shabaab’s ivory business is soaring demand in consuming countries, which translates into high prices. Illicit raw ivory now fetches over U.S. $1,500 per kilogram in Asia; in China the “official” cost for raw ivory is supposedly more than $2,865 per kilogram. That means higher profits for Al Shabaab—and a treasury it can use to wreak chaos. Consumers can help break that lifeline by not buying ivory.

Mamma Cheetah’s Outreach in Samburu

“Mamma Cheetah!”  someone shouts at us from the crowds of people strolling through the dusty streets.  The Action for Cheetahs in Kenya team just filled up the truck and is pulling out of the rough–n-tumble town of Isiolo.  Whoever enthusiastically shouted out to the cheetah team was never seen, but it was not entirely unexpected. …

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Why the World Bank Is Saving Tigers

For a financial institution that strives to end world poverty, it might seem surprising that the World Bank is involved with tiger conservation. The idea is that poverty cannot be eradicated without a sustainable environment that supports not just human life, but other species. Global Tiger Initiative team leader Andrey Kushlin discusses the challenges and victories in the Bank’s quest to double the world’s wild tiger population.

Hundreds of Panther Sightings Reported in Florida

Hundreds of sightings of panthers roaming wild in Florida have been reported by the public to the state’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) website launched a year ago.