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Kids in India Come Together to Save Tigers

In part three of a 12-part tiger series, Steve Winter and Sharon Guynup learn about an organization that’s encouraging kids to care about tigers and the environment.

Voyage to the Central American Dome, the Forgotten Sea

By Erick Ross Salazar, MarViva MarViva Foundation and Mission Blue have teamed up to seek protection for a high seas “hope spot” called the Central American Dome (CAD). A term coined by Mission Blue founder Sylvia Earle, hope spots are areas of particular conservation concern beneath the waves. The Central American Dome is a biodiverse,…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

First Fish That’s No Longer Endangered: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, for the first time, a fish has been declared recovered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed this week that the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) “has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered species or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.” The silvery…

Rare Video: Vandal Fishing Cats Lead to Wildlife Discovery

Endangered Baby Fishing Cat Fishes in the Wild from Morgan Heim on Vimeo. When I set out to cover the story of Thailand’s fishing cats, I never expected vandalism could lead to an unprecedented wildlife discovery for this little known endangered species. Fishing cats are increasingly rare. New estimates suggest only about 2,500-3,000 remain in…

Twenty Five Years Reconstructing an Island Ecosystem

Islands are delicate ecosystems. Although less than 5% of the world’s land area, they are home to over 20% of the planet’s terrestrial biodiversity. In the last 500 years 80% of vertebrate extinctions have been on islands. Restoring an island ecosystem to its original state requires first unpacking the ecosystem of invasive species such as…

Lending a Helping Hand to Rescue African Penguin Chicks in South Africa

Guest Blog by Tim Binder, VP of Collection Planning at Shedd Aquarium As a nationally recognized leader in rescue and rehabilitation work, Shedd Aquarium has responded to animals in need for over two decades. Whether it’s providing around-the-clock care for Cayucos, one of our rescued sea otter pups, or serving as an active responder in times…

Electronic Tagging and Tracking Marine Animals Supports Conservation

Understanding and predicting animal movement is important as it is central to establishing effective management and conservation strategies [1]. Until relatively recently, studying the movements and behaviors of highly migratory marine species (turtles, sharks, whales, penguins, seals and billfish) have been challenging due to the logistical and technological constraints of working in aquatic environments. However,…

January 12, 2014: Climbing Buildings, Hunting Poachers and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb the world’s tallest buildings, ski with the sport’s inventors, give new life to Christmas trees, seek sea life at the bottom of the ocean, discover the unicorn, protect rhinos by hunting for poachers, kayak blind through the Grand Canyon, prioritize protection plans for endangered species, and track the world’s underground water reserves.

Saving the Big Cats of Central Mozambique

It wasn’t too long ago that Central Mozambique was considered lost territory for the big cats, a place where they would soon no longer roam wild and free. But today an effort is underway to hold the line against extinction and ensure that the African lion has its rightful place here into the foreseeable future.  This thanks…

Kenya’s Problematic Progress

Driving on a Friday night from the idyllic campsite to a local farm for an after-dark game count, Action for Cheetahs (ACK) lead researcher Cosmas Wambua navigates a treacherous highway. The notorious Mombassa Road is a twisting, turning, death-ridden mess of an international highway. Bitterly joking we’re on a ‘lorry safari’, sightings include burned-out overturned…

Ferrets In the Night – Recovery Efforts Continue for Masked Bandits in Montana

The region of the American Prairie Reserve encompasses two national wildlife refuges. This is an area of Montana with dramatic cliffs cut by the Missouri River and rugged, wooded terrain housing mountain lions, elk and big horn sheep. As you move up from the river and north across the prairie, an expansive network of ecologically…

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

Scenes from the Philippines: Post-earthquake, Post-typhoon

Guest blog by Dr. Amanda Vincent, Director and Co-founder of Project Seahorse  It’s been an incredibly difficult few weeks for the central Philippines. Following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake last month that caused considerable loss of lives and homes, the Visayas region was hit on Nov. 7th by Typhoon Haiyan (a.k.a. Yolanda), one of the very strongest…

Steve Winter’s Journey to Tigers Forever

This week, wildlife photojournalist Steve Winter’s story about cougars appears in the December issue of National Geographic. He’s become the big cat guy—it’s the fourth species he’s covered for the magazine. This is a also a big week for him and me: our new book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat, published…