National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for elephants

June 29, 2014: Refueling Satellites in Space, Sequencing the Koala Genome and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we walk in space to refuel a satellite, cure koalas of chlamydia, play soccer the Brazilian way, end elephant poaching in Tanzania, run out of air at the bottom of the Arctic Ocean, pair scientists with adventurers, road trip through the American South, and “revisit the Golden Age of Exploration.”

Opinion: Killing of Great Tusker in Kenya Recalls Lesson From the Past

By John Heminway The killing in late May of the great tusker Satao, in Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, was another blunt reminder that no elephant in Africa is safe. A poacher’s poisoned arrow felled him, and his death was presumed to have been long and painful. Satao was thought to be the largest-tusked elephant surviving in Africa. While he…

June 15, 2014: Negotiating Elephant Truce With Armies, Running 50 Marathons in 50 Days and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we negotiate a truce between armies and Central African forest elephants, find common ground between jazz and physics, learn to take a cover photo for National Geographic magazine, run 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 straight days, learn the National Parks Service’s most secret places, and learn about panda bear’s reproductive difficulties.

Controversy Swirls Around the Recent U.S. Suspension of Sport-Hunted Elephant Trophies

Battle lines are being drawn after the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s (FWS) announcement last month to suspend import of elephant trophies from Tanzania and Zimbabwe for the remainder of 2014. The decision was spurred by the catastrophic poaching of Africa’s elephants and the fact that in these two countries, according to FWS, “additional…

How Much for a Picture With the Monkey? The Real Cost Of Wildlife Tourism

I’ve been extremely fortunate to have spent the past seven months working and traveling in Southeast Asia with support from the National Geographic Society and the U.S. Fulbright program. While my research has brought me to Singapore and Gibraltar a number of times, I had not previously stayed long enough in either place to explore…

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

What Do Giant Centipedes Eat? Your Weird Animal Questions Answered

In this week’s column, we tackle the diet of giant centipedes and the life spans of saltwater crocodiles.

Clintons Say to End Ivory Trade, Everyone Needs to Act

The ivory trade is an “ecological and moral disaster” that requires businesses and consumers to take up the fight, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton argued in a joint op-ed published February 23 in the Financial Times.

Surprise: Elephants Comfort Upset Friends

The short list of animals that console stressed-out friends just got longer … and heavier.

February 15, 2014: California’s Drought, Inside the Human Brain, a 1,000 Mile Desert Trek and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are trekking 1,000 miles through the Empty Quarter Desert, searching for the lost civilization of Shangri La, looking at the implications of California’s severe drought, walking through Chinatowns, researching the human brain, getting a visit from the Love Doctor, and learning what makes Russians smile.

Au Revoir: France Crushes its Ivory

France has now joined a growing number of other countries—including the United States and China—in destroying its stockpile of ivory. More than three tons of ivory was pulverized at Champs de Mar at the foot of the Eiffel Tower. The ivory stash was worth more than one million dollars, and was comprised of 698 individual…

Reporting on the Ivory Trade in Angola: Will the Nation’s Entry to CITES Make a Difference?

By Elena Bersacola and Magdalena Svensson Destruction of stocks of illegal ivory has been prevalent news in the media lately. Most recently it was Hong Kong announcing the intention to crush 28 tons of its illegally smuggled ivory to show support for the fight against wildlife trafficking. This comes soon after China, the United States,…

China’s Ivory Crush Is Important First Step

In a surprising step, China last week became the latest in a growing number of countries to publicly destroy large quantities of ivory to bring attention to the global trade in illegal ivory. From any angle, China’s move has important and positive implications for the fight against an illegal ivory trade that is killing tens of thousands…

Elephant Declines Vastly Underestimated

By Trevor Jones and Katarzyna Nowak Earlier this month, international media ran with a major prediction released by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) that “one-fifth of Africa’s elephants could be wiped out in the next ten years, at current poaching levels.” This is a damaging underestimate that undercuts the seriousness of…

Urban Wildlife Corridors Could Save Africa’s Free-Roaming Elephants

Wildlife corridors could pay a major role in reducing human/wildlife conflict and saving the largest remaining population of wild-roaming elephants on the planet.