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Egypt Earns Its first Oscar Nom for a Documentary on Tahrir Square

Dark figures wearing gas masks and angel wings grace the movie poster for director Jehane Noujaim’s documentary The Square, which traces the first two years of Egypt’s ongoing revolution through the eyes of six Tahrir Square protesters. The film earned Egypt’s first Oscar nod, for “best documentary.” To Noujaim, the nomination “is in honor of…

February 2, 2014: Walking from Siberia to Australia, Prepping Putin’s $51 Billion Bash and More

This week, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they walk from Siberia to Australia, celebrate Putin’s $51 billion Olympic bash, get to the historic bottom of Groundhog Day, cycle 11,000 miles from Norway to South Africa, spend 200 days in a year deep inside of caves, dodge the bubonic plague in Madagascar, and search for the last of Africa’s glaciers.

January 19, 2014: Waging War Against Whalers, Paragliding Above Pakistan and More

Join host Boyd Matson as he and his guests sleep high on sheer mountain cliffs, wage war against whalers, consume bacteria in pursuit of better health, crash during paragliding takeoff in Pakistan, eat invasive species, and photograph 30 years of warfare in Afghanistan.

December 23, 2013: Meeting Mr. Everest, Singing Songs in Space and More

This week on National Geographic, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they summit Everest seven times, train for an Antarctic speed record, chase water while dodging cats in Africa, sing along with an astronaut, and overcome a traumatic brain injury.

November 3, 2013: How to Survive an Avalanche, Following Family History Through Asia and More

Join host Boyd Matson, as we survive potentially disastrous avalanche, swim with manta rays in Mozambique, walk the length of Africa looking for water, and follow our family tree’s roots throughout Asia.

Geography in the News: International Shipping Chokepoints

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Navigational Chokepoints Egypt’s stability and security remain uncertain. Amid calls by opposition supporters for the president’s removal in early 2011, the country erupted into widespread demonstrations against the government and President Hosni Mubarak was removed. General elections brought Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi into…

The Sad Ballad of Menes, the Egyptian #Spyduck

Menes wasn’t a spy, and neither was he a duck. Thanks to a combination of xenophobic paranoia and spotty Arabic-to-English translation, this one-year-old White Stork was unfairly painted as both and clapped into jail.

Days later he was exonerated, released, and eaten.

Geography in the News: Ethiopia’s Dam Projects

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM ETHIOPIA’S CAPTURE OF THE BLUE NILE In addition to Egypt’s latest political turmoil, its government is extremely worried about Ethiopia’s newest dam on the headwaters of the Blue Nile. The Blue Nile is the leading source of water for the north-flowing Nile. Fears in…

Egypt: What Just Happened?

The fallout of a thrilling and confusing week in Egypt, where Revolution 2.0 is now underway.

June 23, 2013: Brokering Peace for Elephants, Surfing Down the Baja Coast, and More

This weekend, we learn about how National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay made peace between rebel leaders and forest elephants in Central African Republic, we carry water on our back for a 1,000-mile trek down Mexico’s Baja California Coast, and we ride Europe’s rails in comfort.

Lost for Decades, a Beguiling Curio from Egypt’s Royal Past

One afternoon a few years ago, a friend and I had ducked out of Egypt’s summer heat and into the luxury Semiramis Hotel in downtown Cairo in search of a foreign newspaper. As we reached the doorway of the cramped gift shop, an elderly man, well-dressed, a slight tremble to his hands, came ambling out…

Top 10 Headlines Today: Our New Body Part, Harmful Birdsong Apps…

The top 10 stories on our radar today: Researchers have identified a previously unknown layer in human eyes, mobile phone apps that mimic birdsongs may harm birds, and…

Is Every Civilization Destined to Collapse?

What does it mean for a civilization to collapse? Are we destined to follow suit? Archaeologists working around the world conclude a week-long conference with their perspectives.

Why Did Ancient Civilizations Build Such Huge Monuments?

Why did ancient civilizations begin with the building of such huge monuments? Archaeologists working around the world share their reflections.

What Is “Civilization”?

After days of presentations on five of the world’s great ancient civilizations, archaeologists from sites all around the world debate and discuss the meaning of civilization and what we can learn today from the lessons of the past.