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June 1, 2014: Slackline Between Hot Air Balloons, Curing “Invisible Diseases” and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Slacklining…

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Geography in the News: Wolf Controversies

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Who’s Crying, “Wolf?” Wolves remain one of the American West’s most controversial species. Hardly a week goes by without a newspaper article describing conflicting issues about wolves across the West. Any discussion of the management of wolf populations and geographic ranges brings criticism from…

A New Species of Wild Cat Found Prowling Brazilian Forests and Grasslands

Hiding in plain sight, researchers have discovered that a wild cat called the tigrina is actually two separate species.

5 Simple Tips for Communicating Science

New generations of scientists must learn how to widely communicate science to better protect our oceans

Animal Pharm: What Can We Learn From Nature’s Self-Medicators?

Self-medicating animals use plants and other surprising materials to improve not only their own health, but the health of their offspring.

New “Demon” Ants Named for Maya Underlords

The devil’s in the details when it comes to fearsome new ant species described recently in Central America.

Iguana Research on Gaulin Cay, Bahamas

The final installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Analyzing Seagrass Beds in the Bahamas: Diving into Field Research with Shedd Aquarium

The second installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Saving Lives, Livelihoods, and Life

By Harold E. Varmus, Director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute; and Robert D. Hormats, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment For many people, the term biodiversity might seem highly technical and irrelevant to their day to day concerns. If you think that, think again. It may just save your life.…

Low Lake Levels: Don’t Fight Nature, Plan for It

The Great Lakes hold 20 percent of the world’s available surface freshwater–enough to cover the continental United States with 10 feet of water if you turned them upside down. In many places along the lakes, you can stand on one side without seeing the shoreline on the other because they are so huge. It’s difficult…

Geography in the News: The Everglades’ Python Solution

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com* Florida’s famous Everglades National Park is experiencing one of its greatest ecological threats. Burmese pythons, which are native to Southeast Asia, are devastating the native wildlife of the Everglades. How the pythons reached South Florida and became a reproducing population of thousands that…

Nusa Penida: Black Magic Island, Part II

By Altaire Cambata All Photos Courtesy of Justin May/Interwoven   Multicolored quarter-sized candy wrappers, amassed by the fist full, were slipping through my gloves on my thirtieth trip to the trash bag in the corner of the lot. I crouched again, my dirty knees hovering above the aged, twisted plastic, the remnants of a bygone…

Restoring More than Animals – Returning Fire to American Prairie Reserve

  This fall, American Prairie Reserve conducted our first controlled burn of nearly 900 acres in an effort to expand prairie dog habitat and restore an important ecological process to the landscape. The fire was a result of collaboration between the Reserve, US Fish & Wildlife Service, which provided expertise, personnel and equipment to conduct…

Damming the Mekong River

  Laos has announced plans to proceed immediately with the construction of an 820-meter-long hydroelectric dam across the Mekong River. Critics of the project say the Xayaburi dam, to be located in northern Laos, would be an ecological disaster for the Mekong and millions of people in Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam, who rely on…