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Tag archives for Ecology

Fish Changes Color in a Flash, Scientists Discover

Octopuses, squid, and chameleons can do it. And now, it turns out that a fish can do it too. The rockpool goby is the latest animal discovered to have the ability to change their color and the brightness of their skin to blend in with their background.

New TV “Channels” to Broadcast Live Stream of Otters, Meerkats

So-called whitespace technology will allow us to watch wild animals in real time in some of the remotest parts of the world, according to researchers.

Updates From the North Woods

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field,…

June 1, 2014: Slackline Between Hot Air Balloons, Curing “Invisible Diseases” and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Slacklining…

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Geography in the News: Wolf Controversies

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Who’s Crying, “Wolf?” Wolves remain one of the American West’s most controversial species. Hardly a week goes by without a newspaper article describing conflicting issues about wolves across the West. Any discussion of the management of wolf populations and geographic ranges brings criticism from…

A New Species of Wild Cat Found Prowling Brazilian Forests and Grasslands

Hiding in plain sight, researchers have discovered that a wild cat called the tigrina is actually two separate species.

5 Simple Tips for Communicating Science

New generations of scientists must learn how to widely communicate science to better protect our oceans

Animal Pharm: What Can We Learn From Nature’s Self-Medicators?

Self-medicating animals use plants and other surprising materials to improve not only their own health, but the health of their offspring.

New “Demon” Ants Named for Maya Underlords

The devil’s in the details when it comes to fearsome new ant species described recently in Central America.

Iguana Research on Gaulin Cay, Bahamas

The final installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Analyzing Seagrass Beds in the Bahamas: Diving into Field Research with Shedd Aquarium

The second installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Saving Lives, Livelihoods, and Life

By Harold E. Varmus, Director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute; and Robert D. Hormats, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment For many people, the term biodiversity might seem highly technical and irrelevant to their day to day concerns. If you think that, think again. It may just save your life.…

Low Lake Levels: Don’t Fight Nature, Plan for It

The Great Lakes hold 20 percent of the world’s available surface freshwater–enough to cover the continental United States with 10 feet of water if you turned them upside down. In many places along the lakes, you can stand on one side without seeing the shoreline on the other because they are so huge. It’s difficult…

Geography in the News: The Everglades’ Python Solution

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com* Florida’s famous Everglades National Park is experiencing one of its greatest ecological threats. Burmese pythons, which are native to Southeast Asia, are devastating the native wildlife of the Everglades. How the pythons reached South Florida and became a reproducing population of thousands that…