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Diving Through Kelp With a Beautiful Giant

The Pristine Seas scientists explore a deep underwater kelp forest near Zavora Point in Mozambique, and are surprised by a giant-sized visitor during their surveys.

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

An Octopus Bite and a Visit From Mozambique’s Youngest Ocean Explorers

A group of young local underwater enthusiasts called the Nemos Pequenos inspire the Pristine Seas team with their interest and excitement, and an esteemed scientist is bitten by an octopus, in this update from Mozambique.

Bad Weather, Weird Parrot Fish Fact, and More

Bad weather puts the pressure on the team to get the day’s underwater surveys done, but there’s still time to relate a weird-but-true fact about where sand comes from.

Singing Mozambican Fishermen Are the Perfect Alarm Clock

Shortly after dawn a small fleet of local fishing dhows sailed close to our anchorage, and as the men brought in the nets their happy work song was the most perfect alarm clock and an ideal start to the expedition’s first day of diving.

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

New Caledonia Expedition: A Treasure Trove of Stunning Sea Life

The team explorers the remote Huon Island and its lagoon, encountering a refuge for marine life filled with bizarre and vibrant creatures.

New Caledonia Expedition: Green Umbrellas in the Reef

Written by Kike Ballesteros Imagine you’re on the first day of vacation, arriving in the Florida Keys, Cozumel, Cabo Pulmo, the Bahamas or another beautiful beach destination. Now it’s time to go swimming and sunbathing on the beach, but you have to be careful. To protect against a sunburn you may need the help of…

New Caledonia Expedition: A Kaleidoscope of Corals

Written by Manu San Félix The other day, Alan Friedlander wrote that “these reefs are like windows into the past.” He was right; diving here is like taking a time machine back to an age when the ocean had no human impact and was full of sharks, tunas and groupers. A time when the marine…

New Caledonia Expedition: Turtle Lovin’

Written by Manu San Félix Today we had a difficult day of diving, navigating far away from our ship with dive boats in rough seas. In spite of the bad conditions we were able to complete three dives in beautiful reefs and coral gardens with groupers, sharks and more. Afterwards, we went back to our…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Where Are The Predators of the Gambier Islands?

By Michele Westmorland, Photographer and iLCP Founding Fellow In Part 1 of this blog I wrote about the need for accurate science and compelling outreach images if we are to move the needle on ocean conservation, but I never wrote about what it takes on the ground to complete such a task. I thought I…

Using Conservation Photography and Science to Save French Polynesia’s Coral Reefs

Time and time again, environmental groups looking to protect a certain corner of our globe have failed in the long run because of lack of support from the local communities. If the people who live near and are dependent on a reef ecosystem for their livelihoods fail to nurture it, no amount of outside intervention is going to make a difference.

“My Village, My Lobster” Film Exposes Extreme Danger Behind a Favorite Seafood

My Village, My Lobster profiles the dangerous lives of those who dive for lobster off the Caribbean coast of Central America. The toll to put food on (mostly American) plates is considerable, as divers face death and disability from decompression sickness (the bends)–brought on by improper equipment and very long work hours.

Despite the risks, economic opportunities are scarce. Fortunately, there are also safer alternatives on the horizon.