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They Aren’t Always Smiling: Skin Lesions and Deformities Plague Wild Dolphins

Dolphins are top predators, meaning they feed at the top of the food chain. When chemical pollutants settle into seafloor sediments, they are absorbed by a variety of small organisms. Some of these creatures end up in the stomachs of bottom feeders, which, in turn, accumulate higher concentrations of the same contaminants in their body…

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Celebrating Those on the Front Lines of the Ebola Outbreak This Fourth of July

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Along with her colleagues at Sabeti Lab, computational biologist Pardis Sabeti studies genetics and infectious diseases, working to improve our knowledge and implementation of medical care worldwide. Pardis works with a huge array of local and international heroes in the fight against Ebola, and shares their names and stories here.

Geography in the News: Ebola Terror

By Neal Lineback, Baker Perry and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ebola Virus Spreads to West Africa Dangerous viral hemorrhagic diseases, particularly including the deadly Ebola, are emerging as threats to humans around the world. The deadly disease Ebola has been the focus of intense news coverage since the publication of the book,…

Geography in the News: Polio Returns with Tenacity

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polio’s Tenacity a Constant Battle Just as the eradication of the crippling polio disease seemed within reach, it is advancing again and new questions are rising. Ignorance of science and medicine by the general public, migration from war-torn regions and possibly a new strain…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

February 23, 2014: Cycling to the South Pole, Saving India’s Killer Tigers and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they endure a 750-mile bike ride from Antarctica’s coast to the South Pole, explore the sonic wonders of the world, explain the Yukon’s modern-day gold rush, fly south for the winter with snowy owls, empower Bolivia’s rural citizens to protect their corner of the world, kayak the length of the Colorado and Green Rivers, recover from unpleasant tropical parasites, advocate for tigers and humans when species clash in India, track Turkey’s bears by cellphone.

5 Animals With Spectacular Sniffers

Dogs aren’t the only creatures with outstanding sniffers: Fruit flies, honeybees, and even rats can detect disease in people.

Geography in the News: Malaria

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM  Malaria: The Geography of a Debilitating Disease Malaria has been a longtime scourge upon many countries of the world. Malaria was wiped out in the  U.S. South in the 1930′s, confirming epidemiologists’ and the medical community’s belief that this disease could be eradicated in…

Geography in the News: The Black Plague

Black Plague Gravesites Uncovered Excavations in the spring of 2013 for London’s Crossrail, a large railway project under constructions in the city, uncovered a series of graves from the 14th century thought to be people who died of the Black plague. This terrible disease ravaged the cities of Europe during this periodic killing an estimated…

The Struggle for Sustainability on Africa’s Little Green Jewel

In Madagascar, environmentalism can often take a back seat to practicality and even survival.

Return to the Eighth Continent

Young Explorer Cara Brook is in Madagascar studying the impact of human land development on biodiversity and how it could potentially spread infectious diseases that are transmitted from animals to people…diseases like the bubonic plague.

Geography in the News: Dengue Fever Threat Much Greater

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com DENGUE FEVER Reports of dengue fever were rare in Florida until 2009 when physicians began diagnosing cases around Key West in individuals who had not traveled outside the state. National Public Radio recently reported that, with mosquito season under way in 2011,…

Geography in the News: A Flu Diffusion Model

This post describes where influenza viruses originate, how they are transmitted between animals and humans, and how a geographic diffusion model for the flu virus can help reduce its spread.

Saving Newborns Across Hostile Borders

A massive study seeks to find the source of newborn deaths in South Asia. It’s as broad as it is deep, stretching more than 1,500 miles and two unfriendly borders across sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan.