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March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Mission Blue, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

February 15, 2014: California’s Drought, Inside the Human Brain, a 1,000 Mile Desert Trek and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are trekking 1,000 miles through the Empty Quarter Desert, searching for the lost civilization of Shangri La, looking at the implications of California’s severe drought, walking through Chinatowns, researching the human brain, getting a visit from the Love Doctor, and learning what makes Russians smile.

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

August 18, 2013: Saving Children in Ethiopia, Reigning In Our Sweet Tooth, and More

This week, we stop an ancient Ethiopian curse, then we explore Iran using century-old images, and finally, we power homes using gas from human waste.

“Borrego Stardance” Timelapse Shows Beauty of Desert Sky

Gavin Heffernan, the filmmaker behind the mesmerizing timelapse “Death Valley Dreamlapse,” has released a new video, “Borrego Stardance” (also view above). This new gem was shot in Borrego Springs, California, a small desert town surrounded by the 600,000-acre Anzo-Borrego State Park. (It’s roughly three hours south of Los Angeles.) Via email, Heffernan said, “In addition…

Geography in the News: Death Valley’s Dangers

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Death Valley’s Dangers One of the most inhospitable places on earth claims lives frequently. Death Valley, Calif., is a desperate place to be, never more than this year, as temperatures have approached the world’s record. Forecasts are for the daily high temperatures to reach…

Geography in the News: Australian Fires Out of Control

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Appalachian State University Raging Australian Wildfires Australia is under siege by raging out-of-control wildfires. The fires are being blamed on the continent’s long droughts. Most of its climates are relatively dry ones anyway, but Australia’s long series of droughts has created dry conditions even in its humid climatic…

December 23, 2012: Whispering Dogs’ Secrets, Saving Cheetahs with Donkeys, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we whisper dogs’ secrets to their owners, trade guns for climbing gear in Rio, paint endangered animals onto a barn, teach donkeys to protect cows from cheetahs in Namibia, save the world from a Mayan apocalypse, tunnel deep under Gaza to deliver groceries, sacrifice our fingertips to bee stings in Turkey, and take in hot air from shale rock across the United States.

Where Warthogs Roam at Night….

Kenya’s common warthog, thought to only be active during the day, appears to have ‘swapped’ its strictly diurnal lifestyle for a nocturnal one. In the desert environment of central northern Kenya, food is scarce and there is no drinking water for several months at a time.

Quest for Kenya´s Desert Warthog

Yvonne de Jong and her team are in search of the desert warthog and common warthog- yes, the lovable ‘Pumba’ from the ‘Lion King’- in northern Kenya.

In the Land of the Desert Cheetah

I’m not entirely convinced this isn’t a death march.  It’s high noon in the oldest desert on earth.  Glancing down at the red sand to see a beetle burrowing back under, saving itself from the scorching heat, I’m transported to a long lost nature program viewed from the comfort of a ‘70s wood-paneled family room…

Photographer Pays Tribute to America’s Monumental Southwest

The rock towers, canyons, basins, petrified dunes, stone arches, sand pipes, and other geology formations of America’s desert Southwest are a marvel of the planet. Spread over hundreds of thousands of acres and encompassed for the large part in numerous parks and monuments — including icons such as the Grand Canyon, Bryce, Zion, and Canyonlands…

Devil’s Hole Pupfish on the Rebound?

Photo courtesy USFWS The inch-long iridescent blue Devil’s Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) rebounded this fall to 126 adult fish, 34 more than last fall’s count and the highest number recorded since 2004, the Associated Press reported last week. “We’re feeling like we’re at least maintaining the population,” Bob Williams, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service field…

Sandfish Ability to Swim Desert May Lead to New Technologies

Like the sandworms of the planet Blenjeel in “Star Wars,” the real-world sandfish moves rapidly under desert sand to ambush surface prey it detects from vibrations. A species of skink (Scincus scincus), the sandfish moves as quickly through sand as a fish moves through water. It grows to about six inches (fifteen centimeters) long and…