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Geography in the News: Polder Salvation

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polder Salvation The effects of global warming and accompanying sea level rise are threatening many of the world’s lowland areas. Although most such lands do not have the resources to protect themselves, the polder regions of the Netherlands are examples of such efforts. Historically,…

Geography in the News: Ebola Terror

By Neal Lineback, Baker Perry and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ebola Virus Spreads to West Africa Dangerous viral hemorrhagic diseases, particularly including the deadly Ebola, are emerging as threats to humans around the world. The deadly disease Ebola has been the focus of intense news coverage since the publication of the book,…

Geography in the News: Polio Returns with Tenacity

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polio’s Tenacity a Constant Battle Just as the eradication of the crippling polio disease seemed within reach, it is advancing again and new questions are rising. Ignorance of science and medicine by the general public, migration from war-torn regions and possibly a new strain…

Geography in the News: Chernobyl’s Legacy

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Chernobyl’s legacy endures Chernobyl is a place known around the world. The meltdown at the Chernobyl power plant in 1986 made front-page news and, until Japan’s Fukushima disaster of 2011, was considered the world’s worst nuclear accident. With North Korea’s recent threats of nuclear…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

BioBlitz on Alcatraz: Hundreds of Species Logged for Island Gardens

Alcatraz in San Francisco Bay is a part of the the Golden Gate National Recreation Area best known for its birds and the penitentiary from which no successful escape was recorded. But it is also the home of historic gardens rooted in times when the island was first a military base and then a forbidding prison, planted and tended by personnel and their families, often with the help of inmates. Rehabilitated after decades of neglect, the Gardens of Alcatraz are now a tourist attraction — and they were a big source of species observed for the 2014 BioBlitz in Golden Gate National Parks.

March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Mission Blue, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

Geography in the News: The Gulf of Mexico’s Dead Zone

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Gulf’s Growing Dead Zone With rising demand over the past decade for the corn-based fuel additive ethanol, American farmers have grown more corn than at any time since World War II. Unfortunately, the nitrogen fertilizer being applied to cornfields is contributing to a…

BioBlitz Bug Man Inspires us to Look for Diversity in our Backyard

Veteran BioBlitzer Gary Hevel is at the Golden Gate Parks BioBlitz in San Francisco this year, along with hundreds of specimens of insects he collected in his Silver Spring, Maryland backyard, just outside Washington, D.C. Hevel has attended everyone one of the eight annual National Geographic/National Park BioBlitzes.

Teaching Moments at the BioBlitz

Students taking part in the Golden Gate Parks BioBlitz at Lands End, the rugged northwest corner of San Francisco overlooking the ocean, learned the tricks to being expert birders.

Geography in the News: Majestic Denali

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Denali National Park and Preserve, A North American Treasure In the fall of 2009, documentary filmmaker Ken Burns’ film The National Parks: America’s Best Idea aired on the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Burns, whose film topics range from the Civil War to jazz music…

Geography in the News: Bali, Past Trouble in Paradise

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bali: Past Trouble in Paradise In August 2009, an elite Indonesian police squad killed a man believed to be the most wanted Islamic terrorist in Southeast Asia. Noordin Mohammad Top, a Malaysian born militant, was linked to bombings in Jakarta, Indonesia, and the 2002 bombings on…

Geography in the News: The Scourge of Landmines

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Scourge of Landmines In January 2012, U.S. Navy SEALs stormed an encampment in northern Somalia to rescue two aid workers taken hostage in October 2011. While the rescue itself was newsworthy, the operation also brought to light the workers’ mission in Somalia. They…

Geography in the News: Ukraine’s Crisis

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ukraine’s Russian Crisis In January 2009, the United States signed a pact with Ukraine to establish a U.S. diplomatic office in Simferopol, the capital of the Ukrainian republic of Crimea. The move clearly concerned Moscow. Russia exerts substantial power in Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula…

Counting Tigers by Their Stripes

Tigers are secretive by nature, making it difficult to estimate their populations in the wild. But Dr. K. Ullas Karanth of the Wildlife Conservation Society employs an ingenious solution: he uses remote “camera traps” to photograph unsuspecting tigers and identifies them later by their unique stripe patterns. As a result, he has helped develop a more reliable way to count — and protect — tigers in India’s Western Ghats.