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Geography in the News: Bats Dying

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bats Dying: An Epidemic A deadly disease is destroying native bat populations in North America. Unfortunately, the “white-nose syndrome,” as the disease is named, is spreading more quickly than scientists had anticipated. The white-nose syndrome is just the latest threat to the world’s bat…

Geography in the News: Fire Ants, Surviving and Thriving

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Fire Ants: Surviving and Thriving Summer is in full swing and an invasive pest is making life miserable for residents, visitors and native and domestic animals across the southern United States. Fire ants have an incredible ability to survive and geographically expand their territories…

Geography in the News: The Uncoupling of Iraq

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Uncoupling Iraq As the 2005 Iraqi election approached following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, ethnic and sectarian hostilities increased dramatically. Now, more than 10 years after the invasion and with the departure of American and allied troops, Iraq appears to be uncoupling. Iraq watchers have…

Geography in the News: Geocaching

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Geocaching: Geography in the Hunt A new kind of hunter is lurking in our woods and parks, in our parking lots and shopping malls. This hunter is called a geocacher and is usually part of a team (most likely his or her own family)…

Geography in the News: Hernando De Soto’s Famous Battle

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM De Soto’s Famous Battle Site at Mabila, Still Lost After 474 Years It’s amazing that the site of one of the largest battles between Native Americans and Europeans in the history of North America is still lost to antiquity. Researchers from numerous disciplines have…

Lindblad-National Geographic, a Ten-Year Expedition of Inspiration and Discovery

Ten years ago Lindblad Expeditions and the National Geographic Society joined forces to inspire, illuminate, and teach the world through expedition travel. The collaboration in exploration, research, technology, and conservation has provided extraordinary experiences to thousands of travelers, raised funds and awareness to address critical challenges to the environment, and inspired people to be better stewards of the planet. In this National Geographic-behind-the-scenes interview, Sven-Olof Lindblad, founder and president of Lindblad Expeditions, talks about the impetus behind the partnership, some of the accomplishments, and his thoughts of the future.

Geography in the News: Declining Panda Habitat

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Lost Panda Habitat Two days after the devastating earthquake hit China in mid-May, 2008, officials were able to confirm that all of China’s estimated 239 giant pandas in captivity were alive and well. Unfortunately, the fate of the 1,590 pandas living in the wild…

Geography in the News: Svalbard Global Seed Vault

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Svalbard’s “Doomsday Seed Vault” The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, nicknamed the “Doomsday Seed Vault” by some, has opened its doors and is accepting seeds. The seed vault was created to preserve samples of seeds from around the world to protect the earth’s crop diversity.…

Geography in the News: Geographic Calibrations

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Comprehending Distance and Area Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the…

Geography in the News: Nigeria’s Boko Haram Terrorists

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Nigeria’s Boko Haram A storm has been brewing in Nigeria for several years. In 2011, Christmas Day attacks on Christian churches and a bomb blast to an Islamic school a few days later, foretold a series of brutal attacks that have captured the world’s…

Geography in the News: Polder Salvation

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polder Salvation The effects of global warming and accompanying sea level rise are threatening many of the world’s lowland areas. Although most such lands do not have the resources to protect themselves, the polder regions of the Netherlands are examples of such efforts. Historically,…

Geography in the News: Ebola Terror

By Neal Lineback, Baker Perry and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ebola Virus Spreads to West Africa Dangerous viral hemorrhagic diseases, particularly including the deadly Ebola, are emerging as threats to humans around the world. The deadly disease Ebola has been the focus of intense news coverage since the publication of the book,…

Geography in the News: Polio Returns with Tenacity

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polio’s Tenacity a Constant Battle Just as the eradication of the crippling polio disease seemed within reach, it is advancing again and new questions are rising. Ignorance of science and medicine by the general public, migration from war-torn regions and possibly a new strain…

Geography in the News: Chernobyl’s Legacy

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Chernobyl’s legacy endures Chernobyl is a place known around the world. The meltdown at the Chernobyl power plant in 1986 made front-page news and, until Japan’s Fukushima disaster of 2011, was considered the world’s worst nuclear accident. With North Korea’s recent threats of nuclear…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…