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August 17, 2014 Radio Show: Speaking to Hippos, American Seafood Industry Secrets, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they explore Africa, fish to satisfy America’s seafood appetite, prevent pollinator colonies from collapsing, provide energy to India’s powerless, road trip 25,000 miles with children, save the lion, understand sperm whale “culture”, and follow our noses to find love.

#okavango14: Over Africa’s Wetland Wilderness

Africa’s newly-minted UNESCO World Heritage Site, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, from the air and from space… This emerald green oasis buzzes with life during the summer months when grand thunderstorms sweep across the delta…

Crocodiles and Corals: Face-to-Face With Cuba’s Coral Reef

Giant yellow eyes stared me down, my own green eyes widened by our proximity. We watched each other blink.

February 9, 2014: Cycling and Climbing Through a Sufferfest, Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week, they endure a 750-mile climbing and biking Sufferfest, crash during Olympic snowboard halfpipe training leading to a traumatic brain injury, try to save the Great Barrier Reef from dredging, launch the “coolest” space mission ever, chase Shackleton’s legacy across frigid Antarctic waters, enjoy the restorative health benefits of a 30-million person crowd, celebrate with winners’ dominant body language, and investigate 10 deaths high in a Russian mountain pass.

December 29, 2013: Rescuing Crocs, Navy Seals in Zoos, Swimming with Great Whites, Blackfish and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they try to save man-eating crocs from angry villagers, meet a retired Navy seal at Washington’s National Zoo, find out the dark secrets of performing orcas at Sea World, swim face to face with great white sharks, and survive avalanches by avoiding them.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #17

We are rediscovering that only through sharing will we save this magnificent planet. Social media gives us the ability to share photographs, thoughts, ideas, and knowledge almost instantaneously with powerful effects. A great example of this is National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”. This is a worldwide celebration of our diverse planet through photographs submitted by people around the…

Best Photographs: 2013 Okavango Expedition

Every year the Percy FitzPatrick Institute and Wild Bird Trust undertake the Okavango Wetland Bird Survey. This is a nine-year project that aims to use 71 wetland bird species as indicators of significant change in the flood regime and functioning of the Okavango Delta. The survey involves “poling” ourselves over 250 miles across this enigmatic…

May 5, 2013: An Ambush on the Amazon, Croc Attacks in Africa and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson chats with adventurer Davey du Plessis who attempted to ride the Amazon River from source to sea but was attacked in a random ambush by gunmen; Nat Geo water fellow Sandra Postel discusses the fate of the Amazon River; and an Australian croc wrangler goes to Africa to try to track a river beast.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #6

Explore the wilderness with us… Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist…

January 13, 2013: Bonding With Elephants, Unlocking Our Genealogy, and More

This week, we head to the remote jungles of Ecuador, inhale living microbes with every breath we take, document a dying tradition of working with elephants in India, and learn about an unlikely set of friends in Ethiopia.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #3

Explore the wilderness with us… Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist…