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On the Trail of a Puma

After seeing pumas, their tracks, and their kills all week, we started catching them. Now five of San Guillermo’s pumas are wearing satellite collars that will show us what they’re killing, where, and how – giving us a new window into the workings of high Andean ecosystems.

Bug-Catching: It Ain’t Easy

National Geographic grantee Nik Tatarnic is taking a closer look at the traumatic sex lives of Tahiti’s tiny bugs. Follow Nik’s expedition on Explorers Journal as he investigates the bizarre sexuality of the genus known as Coridromius. —- Well, it’s been 10 days in Tahiti and things have been pretty hectic. We’ve circumnavigated the island several times, ascended…

How to Find a Bug the Size of a Grain of Rice in Tahiti’s Dense Tropics

National Geographic grantee  Nik Tatarnic is taking a closer look at the traumatic sex lives of Tahiti’s tiny bugs. Follow Nik’s expedition on Explorers Journal as he investigates the bizarre sexuality of the genus known as Coridromius. —- In less than a week we head to Tahiti to hunt for bizarre little bugs known for their violent mating…

The Violent Sex Lives of Tahitian Bugs

National Geographic grantee  Nik Tatarnic is taking a closer look at the traumatic sex lives of Tahiti’s tiny bugs. Follow Nik’s expedition on Explorers Journal as he investigates the bizarre sexuality of the genus known as Coridromius. —- In a few weeks we will be heading to French Polynesia for the first of two trips to…

How and Why Our Clothing Choices Matter

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

The Surprising Power of “Sentiment” in International Work

“You’ve got to learn”, my research assistant Arun told me a few weeks into the project, “everything here works on sentiment”. It has taken me a while to realize what he meant by this, but he’s right. Hourly buses and trains can be hours late and power cuts stop to night-time work, but your friends don’t fail you.

Dolphin Mating Season Begins!

Love is in the air at Shark Bay.

Risk and Reward for Organic and GM Farmers: A Tale of Two Villages

Here in India, sometimes it’s not the farm, but the forces behind it that make all the difference.

Dinnertime for Dolphins in Shark Bay

National Geographic Grantee Whitney Friedman is studying some of the smartest creatures in the sea- dolphins. Their complex alliances and social interactions may be more similar to humans than any other species. Follow her expedition on Explorers Journal as she joins a 30-year study on male alliances among bottlenose dolphins in Western Australia’s Shark Bay.  —- It’s…

The Secret History of the Unconquered Maya

Limestone cliff and newly exposed carved rock art What if the Spanish had never conquered the Maya? In one corner of southern Mexico, an alternate historical trajectory has been followed by Maya who managed to dodge the bullet of Spanish subjugation. Since 1990, National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration grantee Joel Palka has been…