National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for conservation

Journey of the Sea Lion, Part Two: Totem Poles, New and Old

Jon Waterhouse and Mary Marshall join the voyage of the National Geographic expedition vessel, the Sea Lion, to tour and discover some of the best that the ecosystems and cultures of the Pacific Northwest have to offer. As the journey continues, the Haida people showcase their ongoing way of life and stunning artwork.

Green Snails: Valuable Aliens

By Alison Barrat and Alex Dempsey You don’t have to look too far to find a horror story about an invasive species that has completely disrupted a natural ecosystem. Cane toads in Australia come to mind or pythons in the Everglades or even lionfish in the Caribbean.  But what about introductions that have gone well?…

Journey of the Sea Lion, Part One: Majesty of the Pacific Northwest

Jon Waterhouse and Mary Marshall join the voyage of the National Geographic expedition vessel, the Sea Lion, to tour and discover some of the best that the ecosystems and cultures of the Pacific Northwest have to offer.

Absaroka-Beartooth Front: Yellowstone’s wild front porch

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text By Jeff Welsch Photos by Dave Showalter, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). High on the rugged…

Q&A: Elephant Conservation Challenges in Sri Lanka—A Conversation With Shermin de Silva

Shermin de Silva, 33, is president of the Asian elephant conservation organization Trunks & Leaves. A post-doctoral student at Colorado State University, de Silva was born and raised in Sri Lanka and has returned regularly to Udawalawe National Park since 2005 to study its elephants, which she believes number some 1,200. Conservationists estimate that Sri…

Legendary Black Leopards Appear on Camera Traps

Krithi Karanth is a conservation biologist working in the Wildlife Conservation Society-India Program, which has been camera-trapping critters big and small for more than 20 years. In these photos, the mysterious black leopard can be glimpsed.

Building on Success

In late fall of 2006, Congress came together to strengthen the primary law that governs our nation’s ocean fisheries—the Magnuson-Stevens Act, originally passed in 1976. A push from leaders on both sides of the aisle, combined with strong support from President George W. Bush, helped overcome political differences. Now the House Committee on Natural Resources…

Should Species Be Paid Royalties?

Perhaps one of the most interesting ways that people use species is to support our own actions, beliefs, and loyalties. Some of the most recognizable mascots and brands in the world are based on the qualities associated with a species or, more often than not, the actual species itself. Our cultures are filled with businesses,…

USAID Comes in on Fresh Legs to Help Save Wildlife

Time is running out for wildlife. Now, like a World Cup footballer coming in for a late-game substitution, USAID enters the conservation game with new energy and some bold moves.

Q&A: Inside the Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking in Brazil

Conservation biologist Juliana Machado Ferriera talks about her work to halt illegal wildlife trade in Brazil, which affects nearly 40 million animals each year.

Local Leaders Restoring Fishing Economy and Ocean Health

By: Michael Bell, Oceans Program Director, The Nature Conservancy in California The best way to protect our oceans is by empowering local communities and fishermen that have the most to gain from sustainable fisheries.  The Nature Conservancy and its partners have tested this theory by partnering with local fishing communities to take charge of the waters…

July 6, 2014 Show: Whales vs. the United States Navy, and Visiting Every Country in the World

Traveling to every country in the world without flying. One man’s journey around the globe was punctuated by only a few stops in jail. And another man documents the fight in the United States Supreme Court between the Navy and whale conservationists who want to keep some parts of the oceans safe for the large marine mammals.

India’s Top Wild-Animal Selfies

Krithi Karanth is a conservation biologist working in the Wildlife Conservation Society-India Program, which has been camera-trapping critters big and small for more than 20 years. These are the “selfies” that they’ve caught animals taking!

July 6, 2014 Show: Dispatches from War on Wildlife and Saving Children from Supersititon

If Africa’s savannas represent the front lines of the war on wildlife, National Geographic Explorers in Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert are some of conservation’s most decorated veterans. They fly rhinos to Botswana to save them from poaching. And Emerging Explorer Lale Labuko saves Ethiopia’s “cursed” children from becoming outcasts at birth.

The Once and Future Common

The conservation of biodiversity through the use of information contained in The IUCN Red List is especially tailored towards the conservation of species that are threatened with extinction. It is natural that the affinity and resources for conservation would turn towards these species and in this regard The IUCN Red List has been exceptionally valuable…