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Zambia’s Hunting “Bans”—Shedding Light on a Complicated History

By Katarzyna Nowak

On August 21, Zambia was reported to have “lifted its hunting ban,” announcing that a ban on hunting big cats—leopards and lions—would remain. One week later, an addendum was issued by the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), clarifying that the hunting ban would remain in effect for elephants too.

However, confusion endures in the media, such as in a September 9 article on Mongabay: “Zambia ends trophy hunting ban, elephants fair game.”

Was there ever a hunting ban in Zambia, has Zambia resumed hunting, and will elephants be hunted?

New Species for the IUCN Red List

The biodiversity of life on Earth is disappearing faster than at any time in human history. Among the many people sounding the alarm of our disappearing natural history the IUCN Red List is the instrument that is used to measure biodiversity loss and the species that are most at risk of extinction. People like Elizabeth…

Maasai Steppe Warrior for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir Speaks Up for Lions

“In a few years to come, the world will only see the rare lion spoor on the sandy soil. If the wind blows, then even those spoor will go.” One extraordinary Maasai warrior shares his message for the world about the future of big cats. Elvis Kisimir experiences the full extent of familial responsibility while…

Marine Reserves in All UK Overseas Territories?

The U.S. isn’t the only country to have the will and ability to protect huge areas of the ocean. A proposal to Parliament calls for the U.K. to create the world’s largest marine protected areas.

Unusual Encounters: Sea Turtles Roaming Off Los Angeles

“Balloon straight ahead” one of my researchers tells the captain while leaning forward from the bow of our boat. We are so accustomed to find plastic debris during our dolphin surveys off Los Angeles, California, that a party balloon is the first thing that comes to everyone’s mind when we come across something round-shaped floating…

Palau Expedition: An Alien From the Deep

Enric Sala describes the beauty and plight of the nautilus, which he finally meets live, face-to-face.

Energy East Pipeline: Putting Eastern Canada’s Natural Heritage at Risk

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. This summer I spent two weeks exploring the proposed Energy East tar sands…

Palau Expedition: The Future of the Past in Palau

Enric Sala and team are back in the big blue on their latest expedition to explore and document the world’s most pristine seas. This time, the destination is the Micronesian island group of Palau.

Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

Who Will Save the Last Primary Forests on Earth?

By Brendan Mackey and James Watson

It’s now or never if the world’s surviving primary forests are to be saved. Will the international community act or continue to turn a blind eye to our planet’s key life support systems? Despite their shortcomings, international environmental agreements can provide incentives for national governments and land custodians to turn back the tide of forest destruction. Primary forests, however, remain invisible in forest policy debates and oddly off the radar for most conservation organizations.

Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef…