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From Paper to Digital – The Mobile App Revolution

Its 3 a.m. in the morning and Ernest Gutierrez Jr. and his brother Derek, third generation fishermen from the island of St. Thomas, are sorting their catch. With only a few hours left before morning customers arrive, they still have their catch report to fill out –a lengthy paper form required by the Division of…

Dying in a Living Room: The Illegal Live Cheetah Trade

Wildlife trafficking has become one of the major conservation issues of our time and the sinister illegal trade in cheetahs is increasingly coming to the attention of conservationists. Unlike leopards, the main trade in cheetahs is not a consequence of the desire for beautiful spotted skins to decorate the house, nor is it a response…

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

Exploring Montana’s Sea of Grass

By Ellen Anderson, American Prairie Reserve -  In prairie ecosystems, it is difficult to see the biodiversity that is there from the window of a vehicle, even for people who are plant nerds like my husband Lars and me. Who can really distinguish different grass species without walking out into the prairie? Once we throw…

Partnership Protects America’s Largest Native Trout in Dry Nevada

By John Zablocki and Zeb Hogan Few places in the world keep their secrets as well as Northern Nevada.  Ask anyone driving across the northern half of the state along U.S. Highway 50 (widely referred to as the “Loneliest Road in America”) what they saw, and the most common reply will be “a whole-lot-of-nothin’.”  From…

Happy 80th Birthday, Jane Goodall, From Nat Geo Explorers!

National Geographic Explorers and staff share their thanks, best wishes, and favorite moments with Jane Goodall. Find out how you can, too!

Citizen Scientists Make Lasting Contributions to Iguana Research and Conservation

Guest post by Rebecca Gericke, conservation and research programs manager, Shedd Aquarium    Comprised of over 700 islands, cays and rocks, the Bahamas is largely considered a maritime nation. When you think of the Bahamas, you may picture clear blue water, endless white sand beaches and pristine coral reefs teeming with colorful marine life, but the…

Palm Oil: The Other Kind of Oil Spill

Max laid hidden beneath the charred remains of a palm oil tree. He was frightened, injured, and falling in and out of consciousness. I clicked my tongue and inched closer, hoping to soothe him. He eyed me curiously, hugging tightly to the branches. All around, the Tanjung Puting National Park burned, accidentally set alight by…

Defending Madagascar’s Frogs From Invading Fungus

By Jonathan Kolby It all started as an idea one afternoon seven years ago.  Having recently learned about the devastating amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd) that was spreading globally and causing irreparable damage to the world’s amphibian biodiversity, I felt there must be something more I could personally do to help save the…

Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

“Strange” New Frog Found in Swimming Pool

A boy in eastern Colombia recently found more than just fun in his swimming pool: A new species of frog.

“Reptile-Like” Bird and Sea Turtles Released on Indonesian Beach

A remote, protected beach on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi is a critical nesting area for “strange” birds called maleos and olive ridley sea turtles, reports the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in New York. On February 23 on Sulawesi’s Binerean Cape, conservationists with WCS and local partner PALS (Pelestari Alam Liar dan Satwa, or Wildlife and…

Signs of Spring on American Prairie Reserve

By Damien Austin Freezing rain has left inches of ice across a snow-crusted prairie. A few days from now the creeks will be running high as warm weather moves in to unravel the layers of winter. It’s also the time of year when my two young daughters stand at the kitchen windows with their faces…

Streamers: A Win-Win for Seabirds and Fishermen

By Nicole Perman Until recently, it seemed as though the short-tailed albatross would not be able to escape extinction.  These endangered seabirds have been threatened first by hunting, and more recently by overfishing in the North Pacific and Bering Seas, and by their less-than-ideal primary breeding ground – a small volcanically active island called Tori-shima,…