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Building on Success

In late fall of 2006, Congress came together to strengthen the primary law that governs our nation’s ocean fisheries—the Magnuson-Stevens Act, originally passed in 1976. A push from leaders on both sides of the aisle, combined with strong support from President George W. Bush, helped overcome political differences. Now the House Committee on Natural Resources…

Another Drop In the Ocean’s Bucket

Yesterday, the House and Senate released the final compromise text of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act, or WRRDA, following months of back-and-forth deliberations over each chamber’s version of the bill. And once again, Congress missed a golden opportunity to secure a major victory for America’s oceans. Ocean advocates had been bird-dogging the conference…

The Bottom Line: Rebuilding Plans Work for U.S. Fisheries

A congressional hearing today on the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act examined a new report from the National Academies on the law’s effectiveness in rebuilding depleted fish populations. As a member of the peer-review panel for the report, I can attest to the amount of work that went into this study, which clearly recognizes…

A New Idea to Protect Wild Salmon

A few years ago I visited Southeast Alaska and saw more salmon than I thought I’d ever see in my entire life. The question: will they be there for our next generation? Southeast Alaska is one of the last places in the United States where wild salmon still thrive. A place where a healthy, fully…

In State of the Union Obama Targets Energy, Climate

Amid discussion of gun control, immigration reform and deficit reduction, President Barack Obama touched on his agenda for energy and climate in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Picking up where he left off in his second inaugural address, Obama took his focus on climate change one step further, calling on Congress to enact legislation to cut carbon pollution and increase clean energy production.…

4 Costly Myths About World Heritage

As the 40th anniversary year of the World Heritage Convention draws to a close, many Americans remain oddly estranged from the program that could be proudly labelled “Made in the U.S.A.” That costs jobs.

No Continental Divide Needed: Bipartisan Support Can Flow From Water

Water is one of the greatest equalizers.  Within regions, most of our water is delivered via the same municipal systems, derived from the same, shared sources and treated in the same manner.  That’s why I’ve always told my family, friends, students and colleagues that there is vast potential to make great strides on water issues…

“Drought Is an Insidious and Patient Killer”: Water Currents’ Jay Famiglietti Testifies to Congress

This week Water Currents’ own Jay Famiglietti came to Washington from California to testify before Congress on the importance of supporting research on drought and hydrology science. Famiglietti, a professor at the University of California, Irvine’s Department of Earth System Science and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is perhaps best known for his satellite-based research on over-pumping…

The Farm Bill Rollercoaster Gets Ready to Roll

This week, the Senate began debating the “Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012,”the latest name for the Farm Bill. This legislation comes up for renewal every five years, and the back-and-forth always been larger than life and somewhat crazy.  If you follow the coverage closely this year, you’ll learn about Southern peanut and rice…

Ending Oil Tax Breaks Could Pay For New Jobs—and Some May Be Green

President Obama unveiled a new job creation plan in a major speech to Congress last week and follow-up speeches this week, in which he called for an end to tax breaks for oil and gas companies to bring in an additional $32 billion over 10 years to pay for increased government spending. Earlier this year, Obama called…

Overfishing 101: Why Ending Overfishing is Good for Fish and Fishermen Alike

NOTE: This is a guest post from Lee Crockett, Director of Federal Fisheries Policy at the Pew Environment Group This post is the sixth in a series, “Overfishing 101.” The entire series can be viewed here. As a lifelong angler, I’m the first to admit that fishing can inspire passionate arguments about where, when and how to fish.…

Overfishing 101: Why Ending Overfishing Pays Off in the Long Run

NOTE: This is a guest post from Lee Crockett, Director of Federal Fisheries Policy at the Pew Environment Group This post is the fifth in a series, “Overfishing 101.” The entire series can be viewed here. America’s ocean fish are an incredibly valuable resource. According to the most recent economic data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS),…

Overfishing 101: The Importance of Rebuilding Our Fish Populations Without Delay

Note: This is the fourth post in a series, “Overfishing 101.” Read the previous posts here. Overfishing—taking fish from our oceans faster than they can reproduce—has plagued fisheries for decades. South Atlantic red snapper, for example, have been subject to overfishing since the 1960s. Congress first attempted to deal with this problem in 1976 when it passed…

Renewable Power Caught in Washington’s Energy Gridlock

By Rebecca Dolan Even though the U.S. Senate seems unable to commit to a plan to reduce the nation’s dependence on fossil fuels, advocates for action on climate change have hope for a fallback plan to increase wind, solar, and other alternative energy. They began the drive soon after it became clear that a comprehensive…