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Tag archives for citizen science

Adventure Film for Monday – Searching for Marten on the Olympic Peninsula

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) partnered with the Olympic National Forest for the second year in a row to help with an intensive survey for coastal Pacific Marten, a “critically imperiled” species on the peninsula. ASC recruited and trained two dozen hardy outdoor enthusiasts turned adventure scientists to search for the elusive member of…

Landmark Adventure Science: public access to a cherished landscape leads to open access data

With temperatures hovering around minus 21 degrees Fahrenheit, six outdoor enthusiasts gear up for volunteer training on American Prairie Reserve. The blue skies and sunshine are deceptive. Standing too long in these temperatures will create a chill in one’s body that is hard to shake, no matter how much physical exertion is expended. The orientation…

Can We See the Invisible, Together?

About three years ago, I was staring at a monitor wall of 2 million crowdsourced “clues” to identify archaeological tombs in Mongolia when three people in black suits walked up and stopped in their tracks.  Two of them were from the Department of Defense, and the third was a gruff young doctor named Eliah Spencer…

Can iguanas swim, and what would it mean for conservation?

Charles Knapp, Vice President of Conservation and Research John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, Illinois USA   Last week, you learned about how Shedd Aquarium’s long-term citizen science research program is helping to save endangered iguanas in the Bahamas. This week, we’ll explore another facet of our 2013 trip: an effort to understand whether the Andros…

Commitment to conservation creates lasting memories

Imagine visiting the subtropical paradise of The Bahamas. Instead of holding a drink, you’re grasping a net. Instead of sand between your toes, you’re navigating sharp limestone in boots. Instead of admiring beautiful sunsets, you’re searching for beautiful iguanas. You can find drinks, sand, and sunsets in many destinations, but if you’re part of Shedd…

Ancient Words: Deciphering an Ancient People and Their Language in El Salvador

Who Were the Ancient Mountain Dwellers of Coastal El Salvador?   It’s difficult to recognize and understand the meaning of ancient texts, words, symbols and the messages they contain.  This is not only due to the very complexity of systems of communication, but mostly because we often don’t see them. During the holidays, I had…

Biodiversity needs you! And your iPhone.

  Our knowledge of biodiversity is not good. We don’t know the names of most species. For the ones that we do, we don’t know where they once lived, let alone where they live now. It’s even worse for species that are rare, for they may soon not live anywhere. Now, armed with your iPhone…

Horseshoe Crabs Need Compassion and Help to Survive

By Jordan Schaul An incidental encounter on a North American Atlantic coast beach with a horseshoe crab may have been your first introduction to this armored sea creature with a spiked tail. Hopefully, it won’t be your last. Some horseshoe crab populations are in trouble and that could mean trouble not only for vertebrate marine…

It’s Pronounced “FOO-sa”

My friends managing the My Wonderful World blog posted an interview today with ecologist, National Geographic Emerging Explorer, and all-around great guy Luke Dollar. He describes his decision to pursue a career in conservation science after finding a forest he wandered in as a child abruptly clear-cut, his work with Madagascar’s fossa (the island’s largest…