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Clean Air Rules Face Scrutiny as World’s Largest Emitter Develops Climate Plan

Oral arguments were held Tuesday to determine the legality of a rule that regulates air pollution crossing state lines. Before the U.S. Supreme Court was the issue of whether the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) exceeded its authority by designing state limits for air pollution when it developed the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR), which was intended to take…

Illegal Trade: The Rhino and the Bling

So your latest model Ferrari is parked in a prominent spot outside the top five-star hotel in the capital. You are meeting friends for a drink and since it is pleasantly warm you wear a short sleeve shirt so there is no way they can miss the golden Rolex on your left wrist—they will know…

China Shoots for the Moon

China is aiming to become only the third nation ever, after Russia and the U.S., to land a spacecraft on the moon.  The Asian nation successfully launched its Chang’e-3 probe, its third lunar mission, early on Monday morning, Beijing time. The spacecraft is set to make the first soft landing on the moon in nearly four…

December 1, 2013: Running the Amazon from New Source to Sea, Fact Checking Thanksgiving and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, join host Boyd Matson, as he and his guests paddle the length of the Amazon River, see Jerusalem through the eyes of its citizens, debunk Thanksgiving’s creation myths, and taking selfies with tigers.

November 24, 2013: Hanging From Antarctic Cliffs, Living With Wolves and More

This week, we live for days hanging from an Antarctic cliff in high winds, then we join a Mexican circus, live with wolves for six years, and crush six tons of ivory.

Worst Weather Ever: Has It Become a Cliché Yet?

The troubles of Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, are getting drowned out by the clamor generated by the superstorms Typhoon Haiyan and Cyclone Phailin. A crisis is still a crisis, however, even if it is not punctuated by 150mph winds and catastrophic flooding. Poyang’s water levels ebb and flow according to the season. In…

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

Fishermen In Palau Take On Role of Scientist To Save Their Fishery

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown The island nation of Palau is a legendary tropical coral paradise, with perhaps the most farsighted fisheries management in the Pacific. Palau has protected its reef fishes from the export business that has destroyed fish populations on many reefs for the limitless demand in China. That’s why Palau remains…

Migration by Any Means Necessary

The airplane passenger of the month for October was an unusual breed of traveler, one who gratefully received first-class airfare even though the ticket sent him more than 2,000 km out of his way. He was trying to head south for the winter, got lost along the way, and has ended up with winter accommodations near…

November 3, 2013: How to Survive an Avalanche, Following Family History Through Asia and More

Join host Boyd Matson, as we survive potentially disastrous avalanche, swim with manta rays in Mozambique, walk the length of Africa looking for water, and follow our family tree’s roots throughout Asia.

Getting to Know Africa: 50 Interesting Facts…

Africa is an enigma to most people… Unrest and violence in Somalia, Tunisia, the Democratic republic of Congo, Egypt and Zimbabwe get more worldwide press than our flagship protected areas and wondrous beauty. Here are some interesting facts about this grand, primordial continent… Please comment on whether you feel Africa has a future? Share this blog with your friends…

Africa’s “Great Work”: The Wild Heart of Africa

The “Great Work” of Africa, the greatest achievements of the peoples of Africa, are the intact wilderness areas that still remain on this wild, primordial continent. Just 200 years ago most of this vast landmass was a never-ending wilderness protected by teeth, claws, tusks, horns and fangs. A patchwork mosaic of forests, lakes, deserts, mountains, deltas, grasslands, rivers,…

EIA: Carbon Emissions Decline

In 2012, energy-related carbon emissions in the United States declined 3.8 percent even as global carbon dioxide emissions rose 1.4 percent, according the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The recorded 5.29 million metric tons of carbon dioxide amounted to the largest decline since 1994, continuing a downward trend that started in 2007. EIA attributed last year’s decrease to several factors, including a mild…

14 Baby Pandas in Crib: Why Breed Them?

The Web’s cuteness quotient has skyrocketed with pictures of a crib full of baby pandas—but why do we breed them?

5 Myths About China and the Environment

Text and photos by Sean Gallagher I have spent the past seven years traveling across China, documenting some of the most pressing crises affecting the world’s most populous nation. I’ve climbed glaciers, ridden across deserts, crawled through wetlands, and walked through sandstorms, all in an effort to try to understand the complex environmental issues facing…