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Bus Rapid Transit Comes to Downtown Chicago

A guest post from Christopher Ziemann, Chicago Bus Rapid Transit Project Manager Transportation has always been essential to Chicago’s economic success. The city was established at the junction of Lake Michigan and the Chicago River and is currently the transfer point of half of all trans-continental goods. With the second-largest public transportation system in the…

Geography in the News: Asian Carp

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Invasive Asian Carp An aggressive invasive species—the Asian carp—is threatening the Great Lakes. Able to consume one-third of its body weight in a day, the carp can grow up to five feet (152 cm) long. It also reproduces very quickly. Its presence may spell…

Interactive Map Color-Codes Race of Every Single American

It sounds somewhat implausible, but a University of Virginia academic has designed an interactive map that color-codes the geographic distribution of every single American, drawing on the last census. The Racial Dot Map uses 308,745,538 blue, green, red, and other colored dots to represent the race of every American in the place that person lives.…

3-D Chalk Art of Colorado River Debuts in Chicago

Visual artist Kurt Wenner is best known for his whimsical 3-D chalk drawings, which he has made on city streets and in museums around the world. Often imitated, the perspective-bending style was invented by Wenner in the early 2000s. In 2010, Wenner made a massive chalk drawing to support Greenpeace’s efforts to protest genetically engineered foods…

Coyotes Not Only Wily, They’re Also Faithful

  A new study of coyote relationships has found that the only “tail” they chase is probably their own (or the Road Runner’s. Meep! Meep!) A recent study of urban coyotes shows that these canine cousins are loyal to their mates and never stray. Not ever. The surprising bit? This fidelity is helping coyotes to…

Paying Homage to Marta, Queen of Chicago’s Lion House

By Jordan Schaul In November, my colleague and friend Anthony Nielsen, a head carnivore keeper at Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, graciously offered me, my sister and my four-year-old niece a behind-the-scenes tour of the zoo’s famed Lion House. On prior visits to the Lincoln Park Zoo, I always visited the Kovler Lion House, a historical landmark…

Why Classical Music Snubbed Pluto, Too

It’s been four years since the International Astronomical Union (IAU) ruled that Pluto is no longer a planet, and the subject remains almost as divisive as the political rumble over climate change. But it turns out that Pluto was creating kerfuffles almost from the moment it was discovered—even among world-reknowned composers. If [like me] you’re…

Chicago Leads on Climate Action

By Wendy Gordon “While climate change is a worldwide issue, 75 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions are generated in the world’s urban areas. Reducing energy use and emissions in cities is therefore fundamental in any effort to reverse the trajectory of global warming.” So reads page six of the Chicago Climate Action Plan, released…