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Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Trekking in the Footsteps of a Lone Wolf for Coexistence

In late 2011, a lone wolf walked across Oregon and entered California, becoming the first wild wolf in the state in nearly 90 years.

He was called a hero, a killing-machine, a rogue, a beacon of hope, a foreign invader from Canada, and school children named him Journey. No matter his name, he came to represent the return of wolves to their historic rangelands in the American Pacific Northwest.

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 - Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

BioBlitz Highlights From the Social Sphere

By Ryan White, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. The big story of BioBlitz can’t be told without all the small stories that make up the event. See some of the best tweets, photos, and more from this year’s event.

Landscapes of Golden Gate BioBlitz

With 2,700 students and 300 scientists counting species in these parks, the total effect is much bigger than the sum of its parts. See photos of the wide array of environments covered in this year’s BioBlitz.

The Ocean Comes to Sacramento

Sometimes California gets it right. When it comes to protecting its coast and ocean, the state’s citizens guarantee that. March 24 will mark the 7th annual Ocean Day in Sacramento with dozens of marine conservation activists from Environment California, Heal the Bay, Surfrider, Coastkeeper Alliance and others descending on the Statehouse from up and down…

Why Do Flamingos Eat Upside Down? Your Weird Animal Questions Answered

Do birds eat other birds? Why do flamingoes eat upside down? This week we answer your most unusual bird questions.

Keystone XL Assessment Report Finds No Significant Environmental Objections

The State Department issued its final environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline, which echoed findings in previous analyses that the pipeline would lead to no substantial increase in greenhouse gas emissions. It found that approximately 147-168 million metric tons of carbon dioxide would be created by producing, refining and burning the pipeline’s oil. The report’s release kicks off a 30-day…

Watch Salmon Stranded in Pool Thanks to California Drought

“Time to pray for rain!” writes Thomas B. Dunklin, a self-described “fisheries geo-videologist.” Dunklin “combines his training in geology and fisheries biology to produce documentary videos on topics surrounding salmon, salmon restoration, and salmon culture.” Dunklin writes on Vimeo that the lower Mattole River on California’s north coast hasn’t seen any significant rainfall since late September,…

Carbon Markets Show Glimmers of Recovery in 2014

A year after the launch of its cap-and-trade program, California formally linked its emissions trading scheme with Quebec’s—enabling carbon allowances and offset credits to be exchanged between participants in the two jurisdictions. The linkage, which marks the first agreement in North America that allows for the trading of greenhouse gas emissions across borders, is designed to escalate…

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society’s Farrah Smith Takes Advancement Program to the Wolf-Dog Hybrids

The plight of some of the world’s most magnificent marine mammals, and the largest animals on Earth, has not been more recognized or better publicized than in the last five years with the television broadcast premier of Animal Planet’s Whale Wars. The award-winning docudrama follows Captain Paul Watson and the activities and operations of the…

Celebrating Success: California’s MPAs at one year

It’s been one year since California launched it’s statewide network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), and Ocean Conservancy is celebrating the occasion by highlighting all the great opportunities MPAs provide for outdoor fun. Whether you’re in the water or on the coast, the protection MPAs offer can mean cleaner beaches, more wildlife, and expanded recreational and business…

“Sea Snot” Explosions Feed Deep-Sea Creatures

A mix of dead animals and their feces that float down to the seafloor help keep deep-sea organisms alive, a new study says.

November 3, 2013: How to Survive an Avalanche, Following Family History Through Asia and More

Join host Boyd Matson, as we survive potentially disastrous avalanche, swim with manta rays in Mozambique, walk the length of Africa looking for water, and follow our family tree’s roots throughout Asia.

Impacts Far Reaching as U.S. Marks Sandy Anniversary

A year ago this week, Superstorm Sandy made a lasting mark on the northeast United States. Many areas continue to recover from the storm, the deadliest and most destructive of the 2012 hurricane season. The effects of Sandy’s destruction linger in many areas where it made landfall, but the storm has had wider-ranging impacts, including influencing how we predict and prepare for future…