National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for bugs

Toxic “Toupee”: Explaining the Most Venomous Caterpillar in the U.S.

No warm and fuzzy here—a possible boom in a highly venomous but irresistibly touchable caterpillar is sending people in the eastern U.S. to the hospital.

7 Bug and Spider Myths Squashed

How many spiders do we really eat in a year? Can cockroaches survive nuclear winter? What’s the difference between venomous and poisonous?

A Few Rainforest Insects to Celebrate World Environment Day

Dino Martins travels around the world to study insect behavior. In honor of World Environment Day, take a closer look at a few amazing insects to remind us of the incredible and wonderful creatures that we share this planet with.

May 11, 2014: Capturing the Spirit of Adventure, Saving Sea Turtles and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Adventurers who regularly push their limits of…

World’s First Female “Penis” Found, in Cave-Dwelling Bugs

Four new species of cave insects in Brazil have sex-reversed genitalia, a “completely astonishing” discovery, scientists say.

Mystery Solved: Why Flies Are So Hard to Swat

Flies on the wing react to threats like fighter jets, banking away in a fraction of the blink of an eye, a new study says.

St. Patrick’s Day: “Green” Animals That Recycle

St. Patrick’s Day is almost here, a holiday famous for parades, parties, and everything turning so green that it’s like looking at the world through night-vision goggles. But when we think “green” we sometimes think “eco,” so in honor of Green Day here are five of nature’s “greenest” animals, not in color but in habit.…

Chemical Camo Helps Frog Pass as Ant—And Avoid Being Stung

The disguise secreted by the skin also keeps the West African savanna frog moist, researchers say.

Dung Beetles Use the Sun to Navigate

Call it a new twist on catching some rays: One species of dung beetle uses sunlight to steer its balls of poop, a new study says.

Praying Mantises Falling Victim to Sex Cannibal

New Zealand’s male mantises have developed a fatal attraction for a cannibal invader whose females devour its mates after sex, scientists report.

Troll-Haired Mystery Bug Found in Suriname

It may or may not be a new species, but this crazy-haired bug is an eye popper of a planthopper.

New Eyeless Fungus Beetle Found in Cave

A new species of eyeless insect adapted to the darkness has been discovered in an Arizona cave, a new study says.

How Do Ants Get Their Magnetic Compasses?

Tropical leafcutter ants rely on a magnetic mineral to navigate long distances, a new study says.

Why Do Poisonous Caterpillars Jump?

To escape the Vietnamese heat, a caterpillar larvae leaps dozens of times a minute—without seeing where it’s going.

The Wonderful World of Arthropods

Pictures: Insects and spiders like you’ve never seen them before.