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New Golden Bat Adds to Animals With the Midas Touch

A golden bat recently discovered in Bolivia has joined the ranks of nature’s richly gilded creatures.

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

DNA Research Reveals Uros People of Peru and Bolivia to Have Distinctive Genetic Ancestries

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project team shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

July 28, 2013: Riding Horseback From Canada To Brazil, Walking Silently For 17 Years, and More

This week, we ride from Calgary to Brazil, relying on the kindness of strangers, then we forego motorized vehicles for 22 years while maintaining a vow of silence, and finally, we get some hiking tips from the best hiker in the world.

Developing an International Conservation Project Around Gran Chaco

Earlier this year Rolex announced the five winners of the 2012 Rolex Awards for Enterprise, who are being honored in New Delhi, India, on November 27. This profile looks at the work of 2012 Laureate Erika Cuéllar, a conservationist who is training local people in three countries to protect South America’s Gran Chaco. “Cuéllar has already proved herself as an inspirational and innovative negotiator who has gained the respect of indigenous people and political leaders alike. Her Rolex Award for Enterprise recognizes these attributes and will support this extension of Cuéllar’s participatory approach to preserving one of South America’s last truly wild places,” Rolex says.

October 28, 2012: Love in the Northwest Passage, Giant Predators in Prehistoric Australia, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we sail a wooden yacht through the frozen Northwest Passage, dine with vultures in Turkey, discover life in an undersea desert in Gabon, remember the 18 fallen tigers in last year’s Zanesville, Ohio tragedy, dodge tree crocodiles and carnivorous kangaroos in prehistoric Australia, feed some birds and try not to get killed, paddle down Alaska’s Tanana River, and save macaws by making traditional headdresses (with synthetic feathers).

The Cellphone that Keeps the Water, and Data, Flowing

NGOs don’t always have the best reputation in the developing world. Sometimes they come into a community, install complex systems to fix a problem, and then leave – abandoning technology that can break down, become unsustainable or simply not help the people it’s supposed to. Water for People is different. They’re an NGO committed to…

Bolivian Indigenous Groups Protest Highway Construction

Indigenous groups in Bolivia have begun a march to protest the construction of a highway that will bisect a biodiverse rain forest region. For more background on the issues facing indigenous South Americans, revisit these articles from the National Geographic archives.

Still Counting: 20 Years of Species Discovery

For 20 years, field scientists participating in Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) have been exploring some of the world’s most abundant, mysterious and threatened tropical ecosystems; to date, they’ve discovered more than 1,300 species new to science.

Bolivian Conference Chooses Mother Earth Over Father Time

By Daniel Grossman Cochabamba, Bolivia–Rarely if ever has the word “Pachamama” been uttered at an international gathering as often or as passionately as at last week’s climate conference near Cochabamba, Bolivia’s third largest city. For most of the week, Tiquipaya, a tiny Cochabamba suburb,echoed with strident accusations against “el Norte,” and loud denunciations of capitalism.…