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St. Patrick’s Day: “Green” Animals That Recycle

St. Patrick’s Day is almost here, a holiday famous for parades, parties, and everything turning so green that it’s like looking at the world through night-vision goggles. But when we think “green” we sometimes think “eco,” so in honor of Green Day here are five of nature’s “greenest” animals, not in color but in habit.…

Why Do Flamingos Eat Upside Down? Your Weird Animal Questions Answered

Do birds eat other birds? Why do flamingoes eat upside down? This week we answer your most unusual bird questions.

These Are a Few of My Favorite Birds

When volunteers head out to the Marin Headlands, part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area for our annual BioBlitz, they are likely to spot many species of birds. What better way to learn their names than with a song?

Hummingbirds May Change Their Tunes to Seduce Mates

Male hummingbirds in Costa Rice can change their tunes to attract mates, new research shows.

Bird’s “Evil Eye” Scares Off Competitors

A look from a Eurasian bird called the jackdaw can keep competitors away, a new study says.

PHOTOS: 5 Animals That Outsmart Winter on the Northern Plains

While parts of the U.S. bundle up for extreme winter weather, the animals on American Prairie Reserve (APR) have enjoyed several warm weeks in January. Since my last trip to the Reserve earlier this month, our staff and volunteer adventure scientists have spotted bison, mule deer, and large groups of pronghorn moving with ease across the…

2013 Okavango Expedition: Amazing Video Footage From Paradise (Part 1)

We have now crossed the Okavango Delta on dug-out canoes or “mokoros” four times as part of the most in-depth study of the Okavango Delta’s abundant birdlife ever undertaken. This ground-breaking study by the Percy FitzPatrick Institute is establishing the data necessary to use 71 wetland bird species as indicators of significant change in the hydrology,…

Rainforest Bugs and Best Wishes for 2014!

I have been exploring the Kakamega Forest in Western Kenya over the last few days. The forest is sparkling with life after the heavy rains from earlier this month. It has been wonderful taking long quiet walks in the forest to look at insects and birds and ponder the meaning of life. Here are a…

Lizard Has One-Way Breathing; Hints at How Dinosaurs Breathed?

The savannah monitor lizard breathes like a bird, prompting scientists to wonder if dinosaurs also breathed this way, a new study says.

Fishermen Work to Reduce Albatross Deaths

By Susan Jackson The albatross and life at sea have been linked for centuries. But the death of an albatross means far more than bad luck for sailors.  It signifies a serious threat to the ecosystem of the world’s oceans – so much so that the organizations that manage fisheries across the globe have established…

Hello, Neighbor: Emus Take Over Australian Town

An influx of emus is starting to take over a town in Queensland, Australia.

How Giant Birds Can Fly Nearly 10,000 Miles in One Go

Wandering albatross can stay aloft for hours without flapping their wings thanks to their yo-yo like flight pattern.

Sounds and Sights of a Midday Oasis on the Rim of Africa

Take a break under the oak trees on the Rim of Africa Mountain Trail with an interactive panorama and audio recording.

Animal Pharm: What Can We Learn From Nature’s Self-Medicators?

Self-medicating animals use plants and other surprising materials to improve not only their own health, but the health of their offspring.

October 6, 2013: Throwing Axes Like a Lumberjack, Wolves Feeding Grizzlies, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we row through a quickly thawing Northwest Passage, then we throw axes with a champion lumberjack, and finally, we snap pictures with National Geographic’s head of photography.