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The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

“Adorably Cute” Tiny Primate Discovery Illuminates Biodiversity of Philippines Island

Meet the Dinagat-Caraga tarsier, a distinctive evolutionary lineage of primate that has just been discovered from the southeastern Philippines by an international team of biologists working with the Philippine government’s Biodiversity Management Bureau. The discovery of the new genetic type of primate was funded in part by the National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration.

Longtime Sea Urchin Diving Partners Lead the Way in Sea Kelp Restoration, Technology and Collaboration

By Leanne Weiss Terry Herzik (67), Gary Thompson (71), and Lucy, Gary’s 8-year-old Chihuahua, board the Sunstar at dawn with enough food and fuel for the next three days. As they pull away, in their 34-foot vessel the sun is just beginning to rise over Fish Harbor, in San Pedro, Los Angeles. They’ll head southwest…

The Global Status of Sharks

Hunter S. Thompson once wrote “It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.” While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that…

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Mostly Madagascar!)

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Here she explores the incredible Ankarana Preserve, as well as theories on species distribution and evolution.

Geography in the News: The Great Lakes’ Mounting Problems

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Great Lakes’ Mounting Problems Recent news about an algae bloom on Lake Erie leading to Toledo, Ohio’s municipal water plants closing is just one of the many problems affecting the Great Lakes. Toledo’s 400,000 people were forced to purchase bottled water for two…

5 Countries Putting All Their Money on Species

Nations throughout Africa have The Big Five (the little five too), Australia has Koalas and Kangaroos, the United States has the Bald Eagle, and Canada has the noble Beaver. Every corner of the world has its species that help to define cultures, geographies, and national identity. However, these five nations have taken their pride in…

Peru’s first-ever high-resolution carbon map could help the world breathe easier

To put an accurate price on carbon, you need to know how much you have and where it’s located, researchers say Stanford University scientists have produced the first-ever high-resolution carbon geography of Peru, a country whose tropical forests are among the world’s most vital in terms of mitigating the global impact of climate change. Released…

IUCN Red List Stops Wildlife Trafficking

If you’re at all familiar, you know the world of wildlife trafficking is as serious as business gets. Although the case is strong against the morality of trade in threatened species, like trade in illegal drugs, it has a potent financial draw. All over the world people conceal species in every conceivable way as they…

A Few Rainforest Insects to Celebrate World Environment Day

Dino Martins travels around the world to study insect behavior. In honor of World Environment Day, take a closer look at a few amazing insects to remind us of the incredible and wonderful creatures that we share this planet with.

New Species of Mammals

In 2008 the IUCN Red List had assessed the conservation status of all known mammal species. Since then, about 200 new species of mammal have been described by science in over 60 countries. These include 72 species of bats, 74 species of rodents, 14 species of primates, 4 species of carnivore, 2 species of dolphin,…

Hawaiʻi Selected to Host IUCN World Conservation Congress in 2016

The IUCN World Conservation Congress is the world’s largest and most important conservation event. Held every four years, it aims to improve how we manage our natural environment for human, social and economic development on a global scale. It includes leaders from governments, the public sector, business, UN agencies, conservation and social organizations from around…

International Island Biodiversity Day

The 22nd of May is the International day for Biological Diversity, and this year the theme is Island Biodiversity. Islands house a disproportionate amount of the world’s biodiversity: although less than 5% of the world’s land area, they are home to over 20% of the planet’s terrestrial biodiversity, and in the last 500 years 80%…

Saving a Darwin’s Finch from Extinction

By Dr. Sarah Knutie The fate of many bird species is uncertain. Those the authorities classify as “critically endangered” especially so. Only exceptional conservation measures can save them. While habitat destruction is a major cause of extinction, introduced species are a most serious threat—and one that we are usually completely helpless to control. One of…

Celebrating 50 Years of the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™

People are fascinated by scarce plants, fungi and animals, and have been documenting the rarity of species for a long time. Following the “gold rush” of the enlightenment era, when taxonomists and collectors were racing to discover new species in exotic and undescribed corners of the world, science settled down to not just discover species,…