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Foodie Bees: Insects Head Downtown for Dinner

Foodies aren’t the only ones these days swarming cities in search of the best eats: Bees also prefer to eat in cities, new research shows.

August 17, 2014 Radio Show: Speaking to Hippos, American Seafood Industry Secrets, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they explore Africa, fish to satisfy America’s seafood appetite, prevent pollinator colonies from collapsing, provide energy to India’s powerless, road trip 25,000 miles with children, save the lion, understand sperm whale “culture”, and follow our noses to find love.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Swarms Decoded

What’s a huge group of whales called? Why do clouds of gnats go after open wounds? Learn more in this week’s column on animal swarms.

Can Spider Venom Save the Honeybee?

A new pesticide based on the venom of a particular spider kills common agricultural pests but leaves honeybees unharmed, a new study says.

Why Butterflies, Bees Drink Crocodile Tears

Moths, butterflies, and bees are known to feed on mammal tears, but the phenomenon remains poorly understood.

Celebrating East African Pollinator Diversity!

Dino Martins brings us an up-close view of the world of insects everywhere. His new field guide is finally here!

Over 4,000 Reasons to Love (and Protect) North America’s Native Bees

By Clay Bolt, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It has been famously said that it is impossible to avoid thinking of a pink elephant once you’ve been told, “Don’t think of a pink elephant!”  Naturally, I’m thinking of one right now; a large, cotton candy colored pachyderm with robust thighs and…

Rainforest Bugs and Best Wishes for 2014!

I have been exploring the Kakamega Forest in Western Kenya over the last few days. The forest is sparkling with life after the heavy rains from earlier this month. It has been wonderful taking long quiet walks in the forest to look at insects and birds and ponder the meaning of life. Here are a…

Honeybees Pollinating Passionfruit in Kenya!

Greetings from the Kerio Valley in Northwestern Kenya. This beautiful valley, an extension of the magnificent Great Rift Valley, is one of my favorite places. It is a veritable paradise for bees and other insects that live in the valleys’ forests, acacia-woodlands and rugged escarpments. The Kerio Valley is also home to thousands of small-scale…

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

Animal Pharm: What Can We Learn From Nature’s Self-Medicators?

Self-medicating animals use plants and other surprising materials to improve not only their own health, but the health of their offspring.

Giant Carpenter Bees in Tanzania!

More from the enigmatic world of bees and flowers: On a recent hike in southern Tanzania at the edge of the Uluguru Mountains I came across one of East Africa’s largest bee: the Giant Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa nigrita). This is just one of the thousands of wild bee species that occur in Africa. Female Giant…

Earth Day Advice From Bees

To help keep the Earth Day love flowing this week, photographer and designer Claire Bangser sent in this image, featuring words of wisdom about sustainable resource harvesting from a beekeeper in Azerbaijan.

Like People, Bees Learn From Watching One Another

Bumblebees may not have the large, highly-developed brains that certain other animals possess – us highly intelligent primates, for example – but they can perform surprisingly sophisticated tasks, like using logic and picking up cues from their fellow bees.

December 23, 2012: Whispering Dogs’ Secrets, Saving Cheetahs with Donkeys, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we whisper dogs’ secrets to their owners, trade guns for climbing gear in Rio, paint endangered animals onto a barn, teach donkeys to protect cows from cheetahs in Namibia, save the world from a Mayan apocalypse, tunnel deep under Gaza to deliver groceries, sacrifice our fingertips to bee stings in Turkey, and take in hot air from shale rock across the United States.