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BioBlitz Bobcast: ‪Night Time Bat Walk‬

When the sun goes down, the Presidio area of Golden Gate National Parks comes alive with owls, snakes, rodents, moths and, of course, bats. In this video by Bob Hirshon, a Bioblitz 2014 team of bat hunters, armed with ultrasound-detecting devices, hikes through the Lobos Creek and Dunes area of the park, looking and listening for bats.

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

Your Shot Pictures: More Albino and Oddly White Animals

See an albino bat, wallaby, deer, and more in our roundup of photos submitted by National Geographic readers.

Striking Picture: Bats Hunt Frogs by Detecting Water Ripples

Male rain forest frogs sing love songs that create water ripples—and attract bat predators, a new study says.

Repurposed Private Parts: 5 Unexpected Ways Animals Use Their Genitals

From “sword” fights to singing to sonar jamming, here are five of the more unusual ways animals employ their genitals.

Bats Use Rolled-Up Leaves as “Trumpets”

A species of tiny bat seems to be using rolled-up leaves like trumpets to amplify its voice, a new study says.

Barro Colorado, Island of Magic Diversity in the Middle of Panama Canal

National Geographic photographer Christian Ziegler shares pictures and thoughts about the marvelous diversity of Barro Colorado, a tropical island sanctuary in the middle of one of the world’s most famous and busy waterways. The award-winning photographer has updated “A Magic Web,” a large-format picture book about the island and its thousands of species.

Moths Vibrate Genitals to Avoid Bats

Moths vibrate their genitals to jam bat sonar, making them invisible to the predators, a new study says.

June 9, 2013: Cooking Cicadas, Colonizing Mars, and More

National Geographic Weekend celebrates the new Age of Exploration by meeting some of the most celebrated explorers of our past. We chat with astronaut Buzz Aldrin about the future of space exploration, American Everest pioneer Jim Whittaker about the past and present of climbing on Everest.

Return to the Eighth Continent

Young Explorer Cara Brook is in Madagascar studying the impact of human land development on biodiversity and how it could potentially spread infectious diseases that are transmitted from animals to people…diseases like the bubonic plague.

Bats Can Recognize Each Other’s Voices

Vampire bats can identify other bats by their voices—just like people, a new study says.

Moth’s Superhearing Evolved to Escape Bats

The greater wax moth evolved to hear better than any animal on Earth—all to avoid their nemesis, the bat, a new study says.

BioBlitz Confirms Four Bat Species in Rocky Mountain National Park

Cay Ogden, retired National Park Service wildlife biologist, discusses the bats that live in Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park, and why we should do all we can to help bats co-exist with us in urban areas. Ogden’s role in the BioBlitz was to organize two teams of scientists to confirm the seven species of bats…

The Hazards of Fly Sex

When house flies get busy, they run the risk of becoming a bat’s dinner.

Counting Stars at the Saguaro National Park BioBlitz

  By Sean O’Connor Artificial lights flood the night sky, making the urban and suburban lives that so many of us live a little brighter, but not necessarily for the better. Light pollution also drowns out the sea of stars shining through our atmosphere. Who doesn’t love to look up at the night sky and…