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Lake Science Goes High-Tech to Understand Impacts of Extreme Weather Events in Argentina

As I walked along the shore of the serene Laguna La Salada at the northern fringe of the Patagonia region of Argentina, I struggled to imagine the severity of the storm that wrecked havoc on this small lake and the rest of Buenos Aires province just six months before. The Southern Hemisphere spring was in…

Developing an International Conservation Project Around Gran Chaco

Earlier this year Rolex announced the five winners of the 2012 Rolex Awards for Enterprise, who are being honored in New Delhi, India, on November 27. This profile looks at the work of 2012 Laureate Erika Cuéllar, a conservationist who is training local people in three countries to protect South America’s Gran Chaco. “Cuéllar has already proved herself as an inspirational and innovative negotiator who has gained the respect of indigenous people and political leaders alike. Her Rolex Award for Enterprise recognizes these attributes and will support this extension of Cuéllar’s participatory approach to preserving one of South America’s last truly wild places,” Rolex says.

Train the Scat-Sniffing Dog

Train the Chesapeake Bay retriever has a dirty job—finding the poop that Argentina’s forest carnivores have left behind.

Exquisite Views of Patagonia’s Wetlands

From close-up views of unusual flowers, to rodent’s-eye-views of the world where moss is grass and grass is forest, to epic landscapes seen only by a camera attached to a kite, Anand Varma’s photographs reveal Patagonia not as it would appear if you were there, but as it would appear if you were everywhere.

Monarch Butterflies: Miles to Go Before They Sleep (and Lay Eggs)

Dr. Stephen B. Malcolm, professor at Western Michigan University, has been studying monarch butterflies in the field for 28 years, recently with support from National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration. He can tell you all about the monarchs passing through your garden this spring — and some of their mysterious cousins in South America.

Lost World Secrets Discovered in Fossilized Mega Dung Balls

A new study of thirty-million-year-old fossil “megadung” from extinct giant South American mammals reveals evidence of complex ecological interactions and theft of dung beetles’ food stores by other animals, according to a study published in the journal Palaeontology.   NGS photo of modern dung beetles by Chris Johns “Thirty million years ago South America was…

A Bagful of Wallaby

On his way to victory and a perfect score in yesterday’s National Geographic Bee, Texas seventh grader Eric Yang had to answer questions related to two animals brought all the way to Washington, D.C., for the occasion by their SeaWorld San Antonio handlers. I snuck out back to visit before the finals. Robert Trejo reached…