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Tag archives for apes

July 6, 2014 Show: Tracing Evolution Through Ape DNA and Chasing the Ebola Virus

As West Africa struggles with the largest known outbreak of Ebola, Dr. Peter Piot shares how he helped discover and describe the virus’ first known outbreak in 1976 Zaire. Also, geneticist Gil McVean studies the rates of genetic mutation in chimpanzee DNA compared to that of humans to try to determine the date of our last common ancestor.

What Are Killer Whales Saying?

People who are listening to the killer whale calls in my previous posting are asking whether we have any idea yet of the meaning. Answer: not as language, but we do know some things. What we don’t know: We don’t know if they have words or language. We think they have signature calls (names) and…

New Surprising Video Shows Apes Swimming

A captive chimpanzee and orangutan take to the pool in the first documented video of apes swimming, a new study says.

January 13, 2013: Bonding With Elephants, Unlocking Our Genealogy, and More

This week, we head to the remote jungles of Ecuador, inhale living microbes with every breath we take, document a dying tradition of working with elephants in India, and learn about an unlikely set of friends in Ethiopia.

Hanging in the Rainforest Not as Fun as It Used to Be? It Might Be a Midlife Crisis.

When people begin to worry about their mortality, they might fight the blues by buying a fancy sports car, having an affair, or even getting a toupee. But, what is a great ape to do?

A Real Planet of the Apes?

In “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” the apes become smart enough to revolt against humans. Just how smart are apes, and how apelike are humans? Take a look at what National Geographic magazine has to say on the subject.

Old World monkeys and apes diverged later than thought, new fossil shows

A remarkable new discovery redates the evolutionary split between the Old World monkeys and the ape-human lineage. By Hans-Dieter Sues The higher primates of the Old World (Catarrhini) are divided into two major lineages, one comprising the living monkeys of Africa, Asia, and Europe and their fossil relatives (Cercopithecoidea), and the other, humans, great apes,…