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Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

The Surprising Power of “Sentiment” in International Work

“You’ve got to learn”, my research assistant Arun told me a few weeks into the project, “everything here works on sentiment”. It has taken me a while to realize what he meant by this, but he’s right. Hourly buses and trains can be hours late and power cuts stop to night-time work, but your friends don’t fail you.

December 8, 2013: Discovering Record Setting Remains, Climbing Antarctic Peaks and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we uncover a trove of pre-human remains deep inside a South African cave, then we coach kids to fulfill their destiny as Antarctic adventurers, and finally, we peer deep into space to watch galaxies collide.

Mary Leakey’s 100th Birthday and Her Legacy

One hundred years ago today human beings knew very little about our ancient origins. Because of the life and example of Mary Leakey, we know ourselves better now, and continue to learn more every day.

February 3, 2013: Paddle Boarding Down Waterfalls, Searching for Venomous Snakes, and More

Join National Geographic Weekend radio show this week, as we kayak off waterfalls, refuse to run from charging lions, and treat disease with venom from some of the most poisonous snakes around.

September 9, 2012: Tracing Human Ancestry, Circumnavigating the Globe Solo, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we kayak down 80 foot waterfalls in New Zealand, ride across the Red Sea to the Arabian Peninsula, race across the world’s deserts, follow our pets around the neighborhood, build floating cities, circumnavigate the world under human power, spy on the Soviet Union, decode the Nazi Enigma machine, and survive an attack from Norway’s arctic terns.

August 19, 2012: Breaking World Records, Jamming to Rusted Root, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we cycle around the world in 92 days, capture snow leopards in Afghanistan, meet Boyd’s radio doppelgangers, take the world’s temperature, send a touring jam band on their way, hike North America, sail across Melanesia navigating by the stars, and dig up China’s ethnically diverse history.

August 12, 2012: Climbing an Electric Rock Face, Fishing in Alaskan Waterways, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we wait out a storm near Mt. Kenya’s summit, add another branch to the human family tree, use the fastest camera on earth to record lightning, risk our lives for the sake of discovering butterflies, out fish Alaska’s grizzlies for salmon, give the gift of electric light using a disposable camera flash and discarded AAA batteries, ride a horse from Calgary to Sao Paulo, and find America’s wackiest roadside stops.

July 22, 2012: Biking Africa’s Indian Ocean Coast, Studying Life in Antarctica, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we bike from Mt. Kilimanjaro to Cape Town, then we hire an army to defend a dig site in Niger, explore the world’s growing city populations, discover what Boyd has in common with The Terminator, hear about the unglamorous side to science exploration in Antarctica, wander around Australia’s Outback, earn recognition for a lifetime’s wok in biodiversity, and finally we dig up a tomb full of millions of embalmed puppies.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Anthropology and Climate Change

  What are the implications for indigenous or place-based cultures facing the imminent and gradually destructive processes of climate change? There is a significant amount of literature that suggests the most vulnerable, natural resource-dependent groups of the world will disproportionately experience the harmful effects of climate change. Less developed countries and their indigenous populations are largely…

Changes In Ancient Humans’ Diet Made Wisdom Teeth Obsolete

Other than a trip to the oral surgeon, there isn’t much a purpose for wisdom teeth, is there? A new study looks at why these molars are such a pain.

Meet NG Young Explorers

While famous figures continue to make discoveries and lead thrilling expeditions, a new group of National Geographic Young Explorers are laying the foundations for the future. If you’re in D.C., join us at Headquarters this Friday to meet Shannon Switzer, Neil Losin, and Emily Ainsworth.