National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for animals

Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Alligators and Regenerators

How long can alligators live out of the water? Are there more animals out there that can re-grow body parts? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Washington, D.C.’s Snowy Owl Found Dead in Minnesota

A snowy owl that ventured out of the Arctic and into Washington D.C. this past winter dies in Minnesota.

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal

A massive grouper gobbles down a shark in one bite. The unfortunate victim seems to have been a meal of opportunity rather than part of a steady diet, according to an expert.

Antelope and Lion Have Unlikely Meeting—Only One Walks Away

Two National Geographic-funded researchers working on different projects, were in for a surprise when they checked the tracking collar data on a lion and a kudu they were separately following.

Can Artificial Insemination Save Endangered Species?

Assisted reproduction is becoming one of the tools conservationists use to help manage endangered species populations.

Mystery Solved: How Snakes Climb Trees

Researchers discover that for snakes climbing trees, it’s all about safety first.

Female Turtles “Talk” to Their Hatchlings, Scientists Discover

New research finds that female giant South American river turtles “talk” to their hatchlings.

The Global Status of Sharks

Hunter S. Thompson once wrote “It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.” While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that…

How Do Glowing Sharks See in the Dark? New Surprises Revealed

Researchers discover special structures in deep sea shark eyes that allow the animals to navigate their gloomy environment.

Three-Eyed Crab and More Freaks of Nature

Nature isn’t perfect: Sometimes things go awry, which can lead to defects such as two heads, three eyes, and other odd mutations.

Your Favorite Species

For three years I taught Animal Biology labs to undergraduate students at George Mason University. Extra credit assignments were not permitted, so I liked to build in a few intermittent low-ball quiz questions to provide some levity to an otherwise strict and challenging syllabus. My favorite question to ask was “what is your favorite species?”…

Avocado Pollinators and the Need for Weeds

Dino Martins brings us an up-close view of the world of insects everywhere. Meet the wild pollinators that make the popular avocado fruit possible.

Q&A: Inside the Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking in Brazil

Conservation biologist Juliana Machado Ferriera talks about her work to halt illegal wildlife trade in Brazil, which affects nearly 40 million animals each year.