National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Amazon

“Slingshot Spider” Flings Sticky Web at Prey, Spider-Man Style

In a Spider-Man-like move, a possibly new species of spider uses its web as a slingshot to ensnare prey.

Your Best Names for the Mystery Picket-Fence Spider

Carousel spider, American dream spider, Druid spider—see the creative names suggested for the new Amazonian arachnid that makes “picket fences.”

New Tapir Discovered—One of Biggest Mammals Found This Century

Talk about a big discovery—a new tapir has been found in the Amazon, the largest land mammal discovered in recent history, a new study says.

December 1, 2013: Running the Amazon from New Source to Sea, Fact Checking Thanksgiving and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, join host Boyd Matson, as he and his guests paddle the length of the Amazon River, see Jerusalem through the eyes of its citizens, debunk Thanksgiving’s creation myths, and taking selfies with tigers.

Purring Monkey? Flamboyant Lizard? New Amazonian Species Are Totally Wild

More than 400 shiny new species, ones completely unknown to science, have turned up in the Amazon rain forest, according to the latest report from the WWF.

New Species of Giant Air-Breathing Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Water Currents previously reported on Donald Stewart‘s ongoing efforts to reclassify a giant Amazonian fish as representing several distinct species. The work of the fish biologist at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) is supported in part by National Geographic. Stewart’s latest work has just been published in the journal Copeia, and marks…

“Extinct” Pinocchio Lizard Found in Ecuador

It’s no lie—scientists have spotted a lizard whose males have noses like Pinocchio in the Amazon rain forest.

What Created This Mysterious “Picket Fence” in the Amazon?

Strange web-like structures found in the Amazon have scientists baffled—what do you think it is?

Where Brazilians Love to Shop (Hint: Not in Brazil)

Anyone who’s ever gone on vacation in a country with cheap prices has heard some variation of the following advice: go with your suitcases empty. Buy everything there and then bring it all back. Favorable exchange rates and developing economies can make everything cheap, much cheaper than you’d find back home.

But there’s a strange way it’s playing out in Brazil. Rather than heading to Cambodia, China, or Bangladesh where many low-cost consumer goods are made, young Brazilians are heading to the United States.

July 14, 2013: Leaving Your Spouse In the Death Zone, Brokering a Human-Tiger Peace, and More

This week, we summit all of 14 of the world’s 8,000 metre peaks with the first woman to do so, then we try to reduce human-animal conflict across India, and finally, we meet some of the world’s ugliest critters.

Deforestation Reduces Hydropower and May Dry Out the Amazon

Last week, scientists published a study in the journal PNAS that warned that deforestation in the Amazon could significantly decrease the power output of hydroelectric dams, which are a major source of energy in the region. The study noted that although removal of trees tends to increase the amount of water that runs off the land, and…

Carbon Dioxide Milestone Revised by NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last week that carbon dioxide concentrations at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii surpassed the milestone 400 parts per million for a sustained period. NOAA has since revised the figure—on the basis of computer analysis—saying its May 9 readings actually remained fractions of a point below the historic level, coming in at…

May 5, 2013: An Ambush on the Amazon, Croc Attacks in Africa and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson chats with adventurer Davey du Plessis who attempted to ride the Amazon River from source to sea but was attacked in a random ambush by gunmen; Nat Geo water fellow Sandra Postel discusses the fate of the Amazon River; and an Australian croc wrangler goes to Africa to try to track a river beast.

Amazon Waters: Conserving Wildlife, Securing Livelihoods

Threats to the Amazon come not only from deforestation, but also from dams, roads, human-induced climate change, gold mining, petroleum extraction, shipping and the unplanned growth of cities, whose expanding populations consume more and more of the Amazon River’s resources.

Geography in the News: Hot Chocolate

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com LOVING HOT CHOCOLATE A new type of chocolate came on the market around 2010. Chocolate makers boasted that acticoa, which is packed with antioxidants, slows the aging process and prevents wrinkles. If true, this is even one more reason to eat this…