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Late Monsoons and Agricultural Improvisation in Telangana, India

Dark clouds and the low rumble of thunder sprawled across the sky interrupting my interview transcriptions.  Finally, I thought.  The rains have come.  Since I arrived in late May, I’ve joined Telangana farmers in weeks of 100-110 degree weather.  Monsoon rains signal the beginning of the most important phase of agriculture, a welcome sign in…

Climate Change Joins Lions and Livestock in an Unlikely Partnership

In the coming years, climate change will transform the world in ways that we have not predicted. The king of the big cats has already survived two major periods of change, but with humans quickly taking over valuable grassland habitat, will they be able to survive another? On the Maasai Steppe of Tanzania, lions have…

States, Studies React to EPA Rule Release

On the coattails of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rule for regulating carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants, the White House issued a report on the health effects of climate change. The seven-page report outlines six major risks linked to rising temperatures—asthma, lung and heart illnesses; infectious disease; allergies; flooding-related hazards and heat stroke. But one week after release of the…

The Quest For Sustainable Corn In Iowa

Ames, Iowa  – They don’t call it “The Corn State” for nothing. Within minutes of driving outside Des Moines, the landscape opens up. No hills. No buildings. Just farms. Sprawling farms, much of them planted with corn. And those tiny green shoots emerging last month from the dark rich soil represent a vast bounty. In…

June 8, 2014: Diving From 90 Feet Above Havana Bay, Free the Dancing Bears and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they run for peace through the Middle East, honor hero war dogs, play matchmaker for dolphins, safely cycle through crowded city streets, pick the perfect outdoor gear, dive from 90 foot cliffs competitively, recover a 500 year old sunken ship, farm the planet’s oceans, and save a species and a community at the same time.

Can Spider Venom Save the Honeybee?

A new pesticide based on the venom of a particular spider kills common agricultural pests but leaves honeybees unharmed, a new study says.

Geography in the News: Svalbard Global Seed Vault

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Svalbard’s “Doomsday Seed Vault” The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, nicknamed the “Doomsday Seed Vault” by some, has opened its doors and is accepting seeds. The seed vault was created to preserve samples of seeds from around the world to protect the earth’s crop diversity.…

My Return to the Future of Farming: Organic and Genetically Modified Cotton in India

Andrew Flachs searches India for answers to hard questions at the intersection of technology, agriculture, and society.

Federal Climate Assessment Report Pegs Climate Change as Culprit for Rising Temperatures, Seas

A new federal scientific report, out Tuesday, concluded that global warming is affecting the United States in profound ways and that human activity, namely the burning of fossil fuels, is the primary cause of warming over the past 50 years. Mandated by Congress and written by a federal advisory panel, the more than 800-page National Climate Assessment further says that the…

Wetlands Do Triple Duty in a Changing Climate

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Restoration of natural infrastructure like freshwater wetlands should become a key piece of our national climate change adaptation strategy.

April 27, 2014: Tragedy on Everest, Rowing Across the Pacific, Wrestling Mongolians and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests reflect on the dangers of climbing Mount Everest after the recent tragedy, row a boat across the oceans and bike across continents to circumnavigate the globe, discover what it is like to be a kid in Mongolia, learn what happened This Weekend In History, detect land mines in Cambodia, travel in style with your dog companion, discover new ways which drug trafficking is cutting down the rainforest, gave through space and time with the world’s most powerful satellite array, and understand why Sherpas climb deadly peaks on Wild Chronicles.

Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

Over 4,000 Reasons to Love (and Protect) North America’s Native Bees

By Clay Bolt, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It has been famously said that it is impossible to avoid thinking of a pink elephant once you’ve been told, “Don’t think of a pink elephant!”  Naturally, I’m thinking of one right now; a large, cotton candy colored pachyderm with robust thighs and…

Worst Weather Ever: Has It Become a Cliché Yet?

The troubles of Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, are getting drowned out by the clamor generated by the superstorms Typhoon Haiyan and Cyclone Phailin. A crisis is still a crisis, however, even if it is not punctuated by 150mph winds and catastrophic flooding. Poyang’s water levels ebb and flow according to the season. In…

Migration by Any Means Necessary

The airplane passenger of the month for October was an unusual breed of traveler, one who gratefully received first-class airfare even though the ticket sent him more than 2,000 km out of his way. He was trying to head south for the winter, got lost along the way, and has ended up with winter accommodations near…