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Tag archives for Agriculture

Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

Over 4,000 Reasons to Love (and Protect) North America’s Native Bees

By Clay Bolt, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It has been famously said that it is impossible to avoid thinking of a pink elephant once you’ve been told, “Don’t think of a pink elephant!”  Naturally, I’m thinking of one right now; a large, cotton candy colored pachyderm with robust thighs and…

Worst Weather Ever: Has It Become a Cliché Yet?

The troubles of Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, are getting drowned out by the clamor generated by the superstorms Typhoon Haiyan and Cyclone Phailin. A crisis is still a crisis, however, even if it is not punctuated by 150mph winds and catastrophic flooding. Poyang’s water levels ebb and flow according to the season. In…

Migration by Any Means Necessary

The airplane passenger of the month for October was an unusual breed of traveler, one who gratefully received first-class airfare even though the ticket sent him more than 2,000 km out of his way. He was trying to head south for the winter, got lost along the way, and has ended up with winter accommodations near…

Campbell’s Challenge: Growing Lots of Tomatoes in Water-Scarce California

By Peyton Fleming and Brooke Barton DIXON, CA – California and tomatoes are synonymous. Drive along Interstate 80 near Sacramento these days and you’ll see an endless parade of trucks, each filled to the brim with 26 tons of glistening succulent red tomatoes. It’s so many trucks, one after another, that you begin to understand…

Stalking the Wild Tomato: The Ethnobotany of Genetically Modified Crops

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

Fighting Drought With a New Super Corn

Text and photos by Allie Goldstein and Kirsten Howard So how exactly do you win a tilling competition? We’re at the Prairie Homestead Antique Power and Country Craft Show in Belmond, Iowa, of all places, watching farmers on tractors practicing for the next day’s tillage contest. “You drive as straight as you can,” David Sieck, of…

Geography in the News: Pumpkins

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM                             PUMPKINS: HALLOWEEN AND THANKSGIVING TRADITIONS Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States.…

Genetically Modified or Organic Farming: Which Will Sustain a Growing Nation?

In the newly formed state of Telangana, India, the high-tech science of genetic modification is mediated by a 6,000 year old farming tradition. PhD candidate Andrew Flachs explores how new technologies are changing farmer lives (and how farmers are adapting new technologies to suit their needs).

Indian Farmers Cope With Climate Change and Falling Water Tables

By Meha Jain, National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee Climate change is predicted to negatively impact millions of farmers across the globe, with some studies predicting up to a 40% decline in crop yields over the upcoming decades. For my dissertation, I travel to Gujarat, India, to understand how farmers are affected by and are responding…

Do Factory Farms Need a Pooper-Scooper Law?

In 1978, New York embraced a major public health and environmental innovation.  The idea was simple: human excrement is captured and treated (for the most part) before being released into the environment, so the excrement from dogs should be as well. The law, which became known as the “Pooper-Scooper Law,” mandated that all dog owners…

Carbon Dioxide Milestone Revised by NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last week that carbon dioxide concentrations at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii surpassed the milestone 400 parts per million for a sustained period. NOAA has since revised the figure—on the basis of computer analysis—saying its May 9 readings actually remained fractions of a point below the historic level, coming in at…

Explosive Agriculture and That Larger April Fireball

Two days after the Boston Marathon bombing, a humongous explosion rocked the Texas town of West when a fire broke out at an agriculture retail facility storing ammonium nitrate. 14 people were killed, more than 200 injured, but despite leaving a crater 93 feet wide and 10 feet deep, the incident played second fiddle in…

8,000 Years After its Advent, Agriculture is Withering in Southern Iraq

As temperatures in Southern Iraq approached 52 degrees Celsius (126°F) last July, Habib Salman, a 52-year-old farmer in the Al-Islah township, shot himself in the head, leaving behind an eleven-member family. The stream on which their farm relied had recently dried up, jeopardizing his family’s survival.

Nusa Penida: Black Magic Island, Part II

By Altaire Cambata All Photos Courtesy of Justin May/Interwoven   Multicolored quarter-sized candy wrappers, amassed by the fist full, were slipping through my gloves on my thirtieth trip to the trash bag in the corner of the lot. I crouched again, my dirty knees hovering above the aged, twisted plastic, the remnants of a bygone…