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Geography in the News: Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Remembered

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Geography of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Scholars continue to examine the history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade between Africa and the New World, one of the world’s most dynamic, yet tragic, forced intercontinental migrations. Reviews of a recently published book in the New York…

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

Massive Copper Mine in the Heart of Lower Zambezi National Park Approved

The battle continues as the Kangaluwi mining project in Zambia’s Lower Zambezi National Park is approved by the Patriotic Front. But at what cost?

Saving the Big Cats of Central Mozambique

It wasn’t too long ago that Central Mozambique was considered lost territory for the big cats, a place where they would soon no longer roam wild and free. But today an effort is underway to hold the line against extinction and ensure that the African lion has its rightful place here into the foreseeable future.  This thanks…

2013 Okavango Expedition: Amazing Video Footage From Paradise (Part 2)

“How do you describe this place to people that have never been into the central wilderness of the Okavango Delta? How do you share the overwhelming feeling of alertness and vitality brought on by the realisation that you are surrounded by animals that far more powerful than you are? Faster, stronger, more agile and, of…

Black Rhino Hunt Auction Won’t Help Conservation

This weekend the Dallas Safari Club (DSC) plans to auction off the chance to kill one of the world’s last black rhinos—and shockingly, the U.S. government may be okay with it despite the species’ protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  According to DSC, which describes itself as both a pro-conservation and pro-hunting group, the…

2013 Okavango Expedition: Amazing Video Footage From Paradise (Part 1)

We have now crossed the Okavango Delta on dug-out canoes or “mokoros” four times as part of the most in-depth study of the Okavango Delta’s abundant birdlife ever undertaken. This ground-breaking study by the Percy FitzPatrick Institute is establishing the data necessary to use 71 wetland bird species as indicators of significant change in the hydrology,…

Geography in the News: Malaria

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM  Malaria: The Geography of a Debilitating Disease Malaria has been a longtime scourge upon many countries of the world. Malaria was wiped out in the  U.S. South in the 1930′s, confirming epidemiologists’ and the medical community’s belief that this disease could be eradicated in…

Rainforest Bugs and Best Wishes for 2014!

I have been exploring the Kakamega Forest in Western Kenya over the last few days. The forest is sparkling with life after the heavy rains from earlier this month. It has been wonderful taking long quiet walks in the forest to look at insects and birds and ponder the meaning of life. Here are a…

December 29, 2013: Rescuing Crocs, Navy Seals in Zoos, Swimming with Great Whites, Blackfish and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they try to save man-eating crocs from angry villagers, meet a retired Navy seal at Washington’s National Zoo, find out the dark secrets of performing orcas at Sea World, swim face to face with great white sharks, and survive avalanches by avoiding them.

Two Emerging Explorers – Kindred Spirits Living Half a World Apart

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species. In that spirit, his blog posts appear both here on Explorers Journal and in Beyond the Edge, the…

Honeybees Pollinating Passionfruit in Kenya!

Greetings from the Kerio Valley in Northwestern Kenya. This beautiful valley, an extension of the magnificent Great Rift Valley, is one of my favorite places. It is a veritable paradise for bees and other insects that live in the valleys’ forests, acacia-woodlands and rugged escarpments. The Kerio Valley is also home to thousands of small-scale…

Kenya’s Problematic Progress

Driving on a Friday night from the idyllic campsite to a local farm for an after-dark game count, Action for Cheetahs (ACK) lead researcher Cosmas Wambua navigates a treacherous highway. The notorious Mombassa Road is a twisting, turning, death-ridden mess of an international highway. Bitterly joking we’re on a ‘lorry safari’, sightings include burned-out overturned…

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

Adventure Science Scouting in Africa: Top 10 Photos

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species. In that spirit, his blog posts appear both here on Explorers Journal and in Beyond the Edge, the…