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Warthogs and primates in the Meru Conservation Area, central Kenya, and the decline of Kora National Park

Yvonne de Jong and Tom Butynski are National Geographic grantees working to track down what may be Africa’s least understood large animal, the Desert Warthog.

Avocado Pollinators and the Need for Weeds

Mee the wild pollinators make the popular fruit possible.

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

Family Strife

Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia – Sunset began with a visit from Paula and Nadia and their fraction of the Athlete family. We saw them break the clearing from the southwest, and I rushed to get two of my volunteers out on their bunker observation rotation, but we were too late. They were coming in fast.

Ozzie on Fire Again

Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia – Ozzie was on fire again Thursday, parting a sea of 14 bulls with his parade of musthy pomp until he reached his target—Mike. Mike is one of the largest bulls in our study population, and also one of the least aggressive. Why was he the focus of the young…

Living Walls Turn Maasai Hunters into Lion Defenders (Video)

In a land where the lion truly is king, attitudes about traditional lion hunts are changing. Two Maasai people – one lion slayer and one lion savior – share the stories of their respective journeys. Species are disappearing at a rate that has scientists around the world calling this period the sixth mass extinction. Today,…

The Night Belonged to Ozzie

The world’s largest land creature stood on me last night—two giant feet over my head, putting me at a disturbing eye-level vantage with a dripping elephant phallus in the dark. It has occurred to me over the course of my research that an untimely end could happen to anyone studying these larger-than-life animals, but it’s not something I ever thought I’d live to tell about.

Time Passes at an Elephant’s Pace

Time passes at an elephant’s pace here at Mushara waterhole in the northeast corner of Etosha National Park, Namibia. The mornings are slow to materialize, a few solitary bulls drifting in like a lazy late morning gust from the northeast and then later from the southwest, each gliding through on non-overlapping paths. By early afternoon…

Sex in the City: As Cities Grow, Are We Forgetting the Urban Poor?

Today, 3.9 billion of us live in cities. That’s more than half the world’s population. By 2050, two-thirds of us will live in urban areas. Today is World Population Day, and this week the United Nations Population Division released the latest version of its World Urbanization Prospects. The 2014 projections show continued population growth and…

July 6, 2014 Show: Dispatches from War on Wildlife and Saving Children from Supersititon

If Africa’s savannas represent the front lines of the war on wildlife, National Geographic Explorers in Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert are some of conservation’s most decorated veterans. They fly rhinos to Botswana to save them from poaching. And Emerging Explorer Lale Labuko saves Ethiopia’s “cursed” children from becoming outcasts at birth.

Climate Change Joins Lions and Livestock in an Unlikely Partnership

In the coming years, climate change will transform the world in ways that we have not predicted. The king of the big cats has already survived two major periods of change, but with humans quickly taking over valuable grassland habitat, will they be able to survive another? On the Maasai Steppe of Tanzania, lions have…

Lair of the Leopard: To Cache Kills, Leopards Prefer Caves Over Trees

A nameless cave from which a whirlwind blows, Pliny the Elder referred to it in his work Naturalis Historia. Vjetrenica, it would later be called. Icy breaths exhale from the mouth of Vjetrenica, the largest cave in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina. The scent of long-closed rooms…of dank underground caverns…of something alive, or once…

June 22, 2014: Defying Gravity With Our Dog, Stalking Snow Leopards and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we soar with dogs, look for a peaceful resolution to Middle Eastern conflicts, recover lost treasures high in the Andes, save snow leopards, venture to the North Pole for the last time, preach the dangers of cheap meat, rehab injured city critters, and ponder our climate future.

June 15, 2014: Negotiating Elephant Truce With Armies, Running 50 Marathons in 50 Days and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we negotiate a truce between armies and Central African forest elephants, find common ground between jazz and physics, learn to take a cover photo for National Geographic magazine, run 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 straight days, learn the National Parks Service’s most secret places, and learn about panda bear’s reproductive difficulties.

A Few Rainforest Insects to Celebrate World Environment Day

In honor of World Environment Day, take a closer look at a few amazing insects to remind us of the incredible and wonderful creatures that we share this planet with.