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Celebrating East African Pollinator Diversity!

Dear All Many greetings from the rainforest in Western Kenya! Am very pleased to share with you a recently complete book featuring and celebrating pollinator diversity in East Africa. You can download the book through link by clicking on the cover image below: Click on image above to go to the page where you can…

Here Today, Dugong Tomorrow!

The Pristine Seas dive team battles rough seas in this update from the expedition team in Mozambique.

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

Baby Baboon’s Frightening Encounter with Lions Ends with a Heroic Twist

Witness this remarkable interaction between a baby baboon, a lioness, and the heroic acts of the father baboon that follow.

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? New Study Offers Strong Evidence

The zebra’s stripes evolved to keep pesky insects at bay, according to the most thorough study to date on the subject.

Kenya Elephant Census Reveals Photos of Illegal Charcoal Production

The Great Elephant Census in Kenya is now potentially revealing a shocking emergence of illegal coal production in Tsavo region.

Is CITES Turning a Blind Eye to China’s Illicit Wildlife Imports?

The mystery of the origin and whereabouts of ten gorillas supposedly exported legally from Africa to China in recent years continues to mystify wildlife monitors. Why is CITES, the international treaty set up to protect endangered species from commercial exploitation, not responding to the situation?

Incredibly Rare Tornado Sighting Over Lake Kariba

Amazing images of a rare system captured over Lake Kariba during a huge thunderstorm. Paul Steyn recounts the remarkable experience.

Mama Scorpion in Turkana, Kenya

Dear All – greetings from the Turkana Basin Institute in Northern Kenya. This afternoon while I was working in my lab I heard a soft rustling noise coming from the waste-paper basket. At first I thought that yet another careless gecko had gotten itself trapped, but on closer inspection found a small scorpion hiding within.…

Mauritius: Charting the Future of an African Outlier

Travels across the South Indian Ocean can be nicely punctuated with an exotic stopover on the small island state of Mauritius. The country boasts a fine airline which flies regularly to Australia and connects to various destinations on the African continent with which it shares geopolitical allegiances, including membership in the African Union. In January…

Awake, Inner Wild Self!

Lessons are learned while walking. When we forget previous truths we are sent (up) reminders. And if there were was anything to be learned hiking up this mountain, it was to awaken the inner wild side and “be less sheepish!”

Pangolins Roll into the Wildlife Trafficking Spotlight

An unexpected newcomer has joined the world’s most iconic species — the elephant, rhino, and tiger — under the international wildlife trafficking crisis spotlight: Meet the pangolin. Pangolins are unmistakable in appearance — they are covered with scales comprised of keratin, and indeed, petting a pangolin feels like stroking a layer of warm thumbnails. There…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

A Mission to Reach the “Snows of the Nile”

An idea, a contest, and a victory lead two explorers into the unlikely land of Africa’s ice caves. Get their story and watch the full film.

February 2, 2014: Walking from Siberia to Australia, Prepping Putin’s $51 Billion Bash and More

This week, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they walk from Siberia to Australia, celebrate Putin’s $51 billion Olympic bash, get to the historic bottom of Groundhog Day, cycle 11,000 miles from Norway to South Africa, spend 200 days in a year deep inside of caves, dodge the bubonic plague in Madagascar, and search for the last of Africa’s glaciers.