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The Genographic Project unveils the ancient ancestry of New Zealand, the world’s last settled islands

The Genographic Project results are in from 100 Kiwis (or New Zealanders). The results were revealed to an excited crowd of participants, which included New Zealand’s own Governor General Sir Jerry Mateparae. Background Earlier this year, a team from National Geographic’s Genographic Project was invited by the Allan Wilson Centre to North Island, New Zealand to shed…

My Fihavanana Malagasy: At Home on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. In the course of her work, she has earned a Malagasy family, which sparks her curiosity for the origins of humanity on Madagascar.

Obama May Use Executive Power to Forge International Climate Change Deal as U.N. Draft Report Paints Stark Climate Picture

A leaked draft of a report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that global warming is already affecting all continents and that additional pollution from heat-trapping gases will worsen the situation. “Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the…

Video: Divers Clean Reefs to Save Marine Life

Artificial reefs, created by intentionally sinking ships, provide a home for marine life of all types. The sites attract fishermen and divers, who unintentionally leave trash behind, some of which is deadly to marine mammals. A team of conservation divers visits three reefs to carefully extract fishing line and anchor rope that have become entangled in ocean habitats and pose threats to turtles, dolphins, and other marine life. For more…

Breaking Down Rocks in the Deep Ocean

When I witness adults cooing over Eocene-era rocks, or tasting 15 million-year-old ocean sediments, I instantly wonder what their childhood was like. Were they kids that didn’t want to leave the sandbox after recess? Were they shy and looked at the ground more than they looked at the sky? Why curiosity for inanimate objects over, say, plants or something with eyes and a heart?

Opinion: Hunters’ Demand for Elephant Trophies Should Not Take Precedence Over Government Accountability

Katarzyna Nowak

While positive steps have been taken by governments to protect elephants and their ecosystems, private hunting companies are working hard to undermine the potential gains.

Rare Siamese Crocodiles Released as Ambassadors for Laotian Wetland

Seventeen Critically Endangered juvenile Siamese crocodiles have been released into into a protected wetland in Laos, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today. The Siamese crocodile is named Freshwater Species of the Week for its critical role in the fragile Xe Champhone and other wetlands in Southeast Asia. Saving the species from the brink of extinction in the wild and restoring its habitat will help ensure a healthy environment and create socio-economic opportunities for the people who depend on the wetlands.

#Okavango14: Listen to the Sound of a Golden Okavango Morning

Listen to the sounds of a morning in the Okavango River Delta, courtesy of Steve Boyes and the Okavango Expedition!

NKAF Summer Space Camp Connects VT Teens to the Universe Once Again

This year’s Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation (NKAF) Space Camp at Northern Skies Observatory (NSO) placed an emphasis on student astronomy projects of the camper’s choice either individually or in teams. At the conclusion of the camp, campers presented a report to parents and relatives about what they studied and learned during the week. In addition…

La Florida: Treasures of the Ancients Under Our Feet

Under the town of La Florida in Guatemala, an ancient Mayan city sleeps—never before mapped or explored. Untold historical treasures could still lurk under the feet of modern-day inhabitants.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Alligators and Regenerators

How long can alligators live out of the water? Are there more animals out there that can re-grow body parts? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

C40 Chair, Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes Featured in Cities Today

This month’s issue of Cities Today – a magazine for urban planners and other city experts – featured an interview with C40 Chair, Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Mayor Paes. In the interview, Mayor Paes talks about his goals as the new chair of C40 Cities, and shares the major sustainability efforts his city has…

Turning Divers into Citizen Scientists

Lindsay Aylesworth is a PhD Candidate with Project Seahorse at the University of British Columbia, Canada. In Thailand, she collaborates with Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, postdoctoral research associate at the John G. Shedd Aquarium, to investigate how seahorse catch and trade affect their wild populations, which helps to inform seahorse conservation and management. Recently, Lindsay co-authored…

Seven Sisters Star Cluster Controversy Solved

Good news for fans of that stargazer’s favorite, the Pleiades. Such star clusters are closer than astronomers supposed, most particularly when it comes to the iconic one known to many sky-watchers as the Seven Sisters.   Not only does a new study, published in Science magazine by a team led by Carl Melis of the University…

#Okavango14: Animals Gallery From Twitter

This summer’s Okavango expedition has