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Ancient Daddy Longlegs Had Extra Set of Eyes

The 305-million-year-old fossil may reveal secrets about the evolution of spider eyes, new study says.

Gift to the Maasai Mara, a Male Elephant is Born

By Joyce Poole Petter Granli and I left Cottars 1920s Safari Camp on the border of the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, the northern extension of the great Serengeti-Mara ecosystem. We were heading toward the Sand River crossing, where elephants had been seen the evening before. The route was not direct, as tracks twisted and…

Wild Cats in San Francisco’s Backyard

Every year at BioBlitz, National Geographic and the U.S. National Park Service rally to get people young and old to explore the wild spaces around them during a whirlwind 24-hour search to identify every species they can find. In advance of our next event in Golden Gate National Recreation Area, March 28-29, 2014, we’re already…

Dying in a Living Room: The Illegal Live Cheetah Trade

Wildlife trafficking has become one of the major conservation issues of our time and the sinister illegal trade in cheetahs is increasingly coming to the attention of conservationists. Unlike leopards, the main trade in cheetahs is not a consequence of the desire for beautiful spotted skins to decorate the house, nor is it a response…

Sea Serpent Eats Cosmic Diamond Ring

A  cosmic diamond ring is the best way to describe the haunting beauty of a distant star in its final moments of life. Located some 2,500 light-years from Earth within the belly of a mythical water snake, Abell 33 (also known as PK238+34.1) represents the final remains of a sunlike star that has thrown its…

Video: In Search of Wolverine

NG Explorer Gregg Treinsh teamed up recently with scientists and adventurers to collect DNA samples from tracks and scat of wolverines in a remote region of Mongolia. Experience the sights, sounds, and reflections of the team on the expedition.

Climate Change, EPA Rules Focus of McCabe Confirmation Hearing

Climate change, extreme weather and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from new and existing power plants were the focus of a confirmation hearing for Janet McCabe, President Barack Obama’s nominee to head the EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. In the hearing—at which lawmakers took jabs at one another on the…

Special Squeaky Sloth Video

National Geograpic Emerging Explorer Lucy Cooke, creator of Slothville, is on a one-woman crusade to show the world why some of the most unlovable animals are actually the most interesting and deserving of our attention, study, and protection. Her new book, The Power of Sloth, celebrates the sloth: the cutest, cuddliest, slowest creature on this…

Mystery Solved: Why Flies Are So Hard to Swat

Flies on the wing react to threats like fighter jets, banking away in a fraction of the blink of an eye, a new study says.

Houston Drives EV Green Changes with Perseverance and Partnerships

This post is authored by Margo Evans, Marketing Director, Smith & Associates and Founding Member of Smith Sustainability Group, Lisa Lin, Sustainability Manager, City of Houston, and Jedediah Greenfield, Public Information Officer, City of Houston. Sustainability is a critical element of the City of Houston’s planning. Over the next 15 years, this fourth-largest city in…

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Pumas in the Rocks, Pumas in the Grass

At San Guillermo, pumas stalk through the grasses and canyons, looking to kill. But vicuñas need to go to those very places for food and water. It’s like Russian roulette – but they do it every single day.

Why Have Tigers Been Feared and Revered Throughout History?

Talking Tigers: Part 5 of a 12-part series Throughout human history, the diverse peoples who populated the vast Asian continent have had one thing in common: They feared and revered the tiger. Throughout this cat’s range, their stealthy, illusory habits—suddenly appearing and disappearing in dense forests, often at night—elevated them to the status of otherworldly beings.…

Bug-Catching: It Ain’t Easy

National Geographic grantee Nik Tatarnic is taking a closer look at the traumatic sex lives of Tahiti’s tiny bugs. Follow Nik’s expedition on Explorers Journal as he investigates the bizarre sexuality of the genus known as Coridromius. —- Well, it’s been 10 days in Tahiti and things have been pretty hectic. We’ve circumnavigated the island several times, ascended…

BioBlitz Bobcast: It’s a Wrap

The final tally for this year’s BioBlitz at Golden Gate National Parks includes everything from a mountain lion to a tree-dwelling salamander. Top officials from the National Park Service and National Geographic describe each group of organisms. Bob Hirshon reports.