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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #65

We cannot overstate the dedication of wild bird photographers around the world. Birds are extremely risk-averse and getting close is a time-earned skill born of years learning about their behaviour. Knowledge of your camera is essential with no room for error before this bird takes off. The wild bird photographs in this week’s collection are…

Here Today, Dugong Tomorrow!

The Pristine Seas dive team battles rough seas in this update from the expedition team in Mozambique.

Top 10 Photos of Adventure Science on the American Prairie

Landmark is the groundbreaking project that Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation has undertaken in conjunction with American Prairie Reserve (APR) to provide “boots on the ground” support for the conservation management team at APR. Landmark crews spend 1-3 month-long stints on the reserve participating in all aspects of wildlife conservation research on foot, ski and bike giving them a…

Monarch Butterflies Shrink, Get Paler After Skipping a Meal

Brilliantly colored monarch butterflies literally are what they eat—and missing even one meal can be harmful, a new study says.

Diving Through Kelp With a Beautiful Giant

The Pristine Seas scientists explore a deep underwater kelp forest near Zavora Point in Mozambique, and are surprised by a giant-sized visitor during their surveys.

Geography in the News: Chernobyl’s Legacy

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Chernobyl’s legacy endures Chernobyl is a place known around the world. The meltdown at the Chernobyl power plant in 1986 made front-page news and, until Japan’s Fukushima disaster of 2011, was considered the world’s worst nuclear accident. With North Korea’s recent threats of nuclear…

April 13, 2014: Cutting Cake with Jane Goodall, Saving Sparrows with Photography and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 - Dr. Jane Goodall pioneered studies that sought to understand…

Mystery Solved: Why Flies Are So Hard to Swat

Flies on the wing react to threats like fighter jets, banking away in a fraction of the blink of an eye, a new study says.

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Pumas in the Rocks, Pumas in the Grass

At San Guillermo, pumas stalk through the grasses and canyons, looking to kill. But vicuñas need to go to those very places for food and water. It’s like Russian roulette – but they do it every single day.

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered: Is Your Dog Part Coyote?

Is your dog part coyote? Do St. Bernards really rescue people? Get the facts on man’s best friend in this week’s column.

Exploring Montana’s Sea of Grass

By Ellen Anderson, American Prairie Reserve -  In prairie ecosystems, it is difficult to see the biodiversity that is there from the window of a vehicle, even for people who are plant nerds like my husband Lars and me. Who can really distinguish different grass species without walking out into the prairie? Once we throw…

Bad Weather, Weird Parrot Fish Fact, and More

Bad weather puts the pressure on the team to get the day’s underwater surveys done, but there’s still time to relate a weird-but-true fact about where sand comes from.

Why Do Adult Cougars Kill Each Other?

F51, an adult female mountain lion currently tracked by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, meandered towards the eastern edge of her range, her two female offspring bouncing like electrons in orbit around her. Who can say what a mountain lion thinks, but from our perspective, life seemed good for F51. The family had fed off a…