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Watch Raccoons Escape Trash Can—Are Urban Animals Getting Smarter?

A new video suggests that these “perfect little urban warriors” may be smarter than their rural kin, a scientist says.

Fish Changes Color in a Flash, Scientists Discover

Octopuses, squid, and chameleons can do it. And now, it turns out that a fish can do it too. The rockpool goby is the latest animal discovered to have the ability to change their color and the brightness of their skin to blend in with their background.

Expedition Launches to Rapa Iti and Marotiri

A new expedition will investigate the untold sea life around the most southern islands in all of French Polynesia. Follow along with updates from the field.

Mystery Solved? How Birds Weather Turbulence

When turbulence hits, flying birds can’t fasten their seatbelts—so at least one species of eagle tucks its wings to stabilize flight, a new study says.

Innovation in the air for one of the oldest public health interventions

When you walk up to a sink in a public restroom, there’s a good chance that you’ll be greeted by a poster reminding you to wash your hands. In this installment of Digital Diversity, Layla McCay – a member of our Media and Research Team – talks more about one of the oldest public health…

Photos From Rupal Peak, Pakistan

Follow ASC adventurer Pericles Niarchos on an expedition to Pakistan, and deep into a crevasse to collect samples of glacial ice.

New TV “Channels” to Broadcast Live Stream of Otters, Meerkats

So-called whitespace technology will allow us to watch wild animals in real time in some of the remotest parts of the world, according to researchers.

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund on expedition with iLCP partner, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. Onboard the M/Y Golden Shadow,…

October 12, 2014: Fighting South Pole Frostbite, Bathing Elephants and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive frostbite on the frozen continent, explore Haiti’s marine culture, bathe an elephant, bobsled with British champions, dance with Birds of Paradise, learn the Secrets of the National Parks, and discover what has been hiding in Vietnam’s jungles.

Mouse Impacts on Antipodes Island

Eradication of an invasive species from an island must be justified by strong evidence of their negative impacts on the ecosystem, and confidence that those impacts outweigh any unexpected surprise effects which might occur. For invasive rats and mice these impacts have been already well documented globally. In some cases impacts of mice may be…

#okavango14: Highlights Of Google HangOut In Okavango Wilderness!

In late-August, we conducted a 17-day, 340km research expedition in dug-out canoes or “mekoro” across the Okavango Delta. It had taken us almost a week to get to “Out There Island” just 30min before this live Google+ Hangout On Air from the remote wilderness of northern Botswana. We were sitting in the middle of one of…

Springtime and Possibility in Madagascar

Springtime in Madagascar is only just beginning as fall blankets the Northern Hemisphere. It’s a busy, trying, unique and rewarding time to study pathogens in bats!

Snake Robots Crack Mystery of How Reptiles Climb Dunes

High-speed video and customized “snakebots” have revealed that a desert snake uses a highly unique slither to climb sandy hills, a new study says.

Watch Nat Geo’s Roundup of Best Octopus Videos

What better way to mark International Octopus Day than with a roundup of some of our favorite octopus videos. Watch as they battle it out with other sea creatures.

Ancient “Oddball” Mammal Reshuffles Family Tree?

A mysterious mammal that waded through South Asian swamps 48 million years ago is a distant cousin of modern rhinoceroses and tapirs, a new study says.