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Two-Headed Dolphin Is Super Rare

A dead two-headed dolphin that washed ashore this week in Turkey is only the fifth-known case of conjoined twins in dolphins, experts say.

Whales and Dolphins Squeal With Delight, Study Finds

Whales and dolphins express their anticipation of a reward by squealing like kids, a new study confirms for the first time.

Searching for Sustainabile Clothing in India

Andrew Flachs researchers the trials of Indian farmers and their rush toward modern farming practices, such as GMO crops and new pesticides. With time to reflect on his journey, he explains why these farmers do what they do, and why the question of how to approach farming is a complex one.

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part VI: Gjirokaster

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. The mountains of Albania hide some of the most remote of the Bektashi Order, yet they are still legendary among the local people.

Small Caribbean Island Shows Bold Ocean Leadership: Barbuda Overhauls Reef and Fisheries Management for Sustainability

On August 12th, Barbuda Council signed into law a sweeping set of new ocean management regulations that zone their coastal waters, strengthen fisheries management, and establish a network of marine sanctuaries. This comes after seventeen months of extensive community consultation and scientific research supported by the Waitt Institute. With these new policies, the small island…

Midnight Sun Fun

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. The midnight sun circles in an endless, natural rhythm as the team digs through perplexing terrain.

#okavango14: First-Ever Live-Data Expedition Across Okavango Delta

As the Okavango

Over-Invasion of Invasive Species

With invasive species colonising more and more locations it is only a matter of time before two similar species come in to contact with one another. Looking at the existing literature it seems there are already many cases of this, such as in similar species of foxes, wasps, ants, crayfish and plants. Our work looking…

They Aren’t Always Smiling: Skin Lesions and Deformities Plague Wild Dolphins

Dolphins are top predators, meaning they feed at the top of the food chain. When chemical pollutants settle into seafloor sediments, they are absorbed by a variety of small organisms. Some of these creatures end up in the stomachs of bottom feeders, which, in turn, accumulate higher concentrations of the same contaminants in their body…

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway

Rocking lazily in the gentle swell as our floating country of 113 people steams out to the first drill site offers me time to recollect what it takes to finally pull out of port. Stepping aboard this 471-foot ocean drill ship, which flies a Cyprus flag, are 30 scientists hailing from countries such as France,…

Mako Shark Madness

In honor of Shark Week, for the next few days I am going to be posting some cool facts and photos of the sharks I have had the pleasure of swimming with. Check out the Shortfin Mako Shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), one of the fastest fish in the ocean.   Shortfin Mako facts at a glance…

A Healer’s Meridian: Where Eastern and Western Healing Intersect

When the conveniences of Western healthcare are removed, how do you treat an illness? “A Healer’s Meridian” explores the power of healing in Laos, where Eastern traditions intersect with Western treatment.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Mostly Madagascar!)

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Here she explores the incredible Ankarana Preserve, as well as theories on species distribution and evolution.

Bone Rush in the Arctic

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. At last, the find that the team has been waiting for emerges!

Yukon Expedition: The Forgotten Carbon Sink

Katherine Lininger and Micah Nelson are investigating how much carbon is stored in floodplains in the central Yukon River basin in interior Alaska. They and their colleagues just got back from spending five weeks in the beautiful and mysterious Yukon!