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88-Year-Old Samburu Woman Sees a Dentist for the First Time

For some, taking care of their teeth is simply a case of heading over to the local dentist for a check-up, a bit of discomfort and to perhaps endure a filling, if necessary.  For others it’s not so easy. There are parts of Africa where people will go their entire lives without even seeing a dentist,…

Cold Nights in Africa: How Temperature Threatens Birds

Gavin Leighton is conducting experiments among weaver birds in Africa to try to understand the evolution of their amazing societies. Plummeting temperatures change the game of survival not just for weaver birds, but also all of the animals around them.

Illuminating Fossils: Light’s Importance in Paleontology

Emily Hughes brings us tales of adventure and discovery from the Australian Outback as she and her mother search for unbelievably ancient fossils. Photographers and professors of physics understand the importance of light, but surprisingly enough, so do paleontologists.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Animal Eyes

From cats to clams, the animal kingdom literally has many different ways of seeing things. This week on Ask Your Weird Animal Questions, we’re taking a visionary look at nature.

Icelanders Grieve for the Peculiar Lake Balls

  Dr. Isamu Wakana prepares for a dive in Lake Mývatn in Iceland. Isamu is an expert on algae and has come a long way from Japan on his search for an extremely rare plant. As he descends to the bottom he is met by brown silt in every direction. This area was once covered by…

Should Species Be Paid Royalties?

Perhaps one of the most interesting ways that people use species is to support our own actions, beliefs, and loyalties. Some of the most recognizable mascots and brands in the world are based on the qualities associated with a species or, more often than not, the actual species itself. Our cultures are filled with businesses,…

Dead and Lost Boobies: Harbingers of a Growing El Niño?

Starving seabirds far from home may point to a brewing El Nino in the Pacific.

Q&A: Inside the Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking in Brazil

Conservation biologist Juliana Machado Ferriera talks about her work to halt illegal wildlife trade in Brazil, which affects nearly 40 million animals each year.

Local Leaders Restoring Fishing Economy and Ocean Health

By: Michael Bell, Oceans Program Director, The Nature Conservancy in California The best way to protect our oceans is by empowering local communities and fishermen that have the most to gain from sustainable fisheries.  The Nature Conservancy and its partners have tested this theory by partnering with local fishing communities to take charge of the waters…

Watch: Sneaky Octopus Dismantles Camera

Such behavior isn’t out of the ordinary for octopi, among the most clever—and mischievous—of the invertebrates, expert says.

Studying the Largest Bird Nests in the World

Gavin Leighton is conducting experiments among weaver birds in Africa to try to understand the evolution of their amazing societies. Gavin is making his introductions and debut!

Horse Bones, Chicken Bones… and Some Mystery Bones!

Sarah Kennedy is using animal remains to dig through Peru’s colonial past. Sifting through the multitude of strange animal bones, she and her team find some that are a sheer mystery!

Transgender Algae Show How Males and Females Came to Be

How sexes evolved in the first place has been a lasting mystery in biology. Thanks to some transgender algae, scientists may have cracked this evolutionary whodunit.

July 6, 2014 Show: Tracing Evolution Through Ape DNA and Chasing the Ebola Virus

As West Africa struggles with the largest known outbreak of Ebola, Dr. Peter Piot shares how he helped discover and describe the virus’ first known outbreak in 1976 Zaire. Also, geneticist Gil McVean studies the rates of genetic mutation in chimpanzee DNA compared to that of humans to try to determine the date of our last common ancestor.

“Monster” Sea Scorpion Was a Gentle Giant

New research suggests that fearsome-looking giant sea scorpions were actually likely gentle giants.