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Why Do Adult Cougars Kill Each Other?

F51, an adult female mountain lion currently tracked by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, meandered towards the eastern edge of her range, her two female offspring bouncing like electrons in orbit around her. Who can say what a mountain lion thinks, but from our perspective, life seemed good for F51. The family had fed off a…

Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

Catastrophic Landslides on Antipodes Island

This recent Austral (southern hemisphere) summer a team of researchers continued their annual Antipodean albatross monitoring. The Antipodean wandering albatross (Diomedea antipodensis) is only found on Antipodes Island, and is a close relative of the Gibson’s wandering albatross found on nearby Adams Island. This monitoring work has been going on for 20 years and has…

New Species: Pink-and-Yellow Frog With Spikes

High in the mountains of Vietnam, scientists have found a “striking” new species of pink-and-yellow frog covered with sharp spikes, a new study says.

Governor’s Institutes of VT and NKAF Team Up to Deliver Astrophotography to Vermont Teens

The Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation (NKAF) was honored to teach at a Governor’s Institutes of Vermont Winter Weekend in February at Goddard College.  The astrophotography immersion weekend helped GIV reach its goal of delivering in-depth STEM training to young people from high schools throughout Vermont, and it included a trip to Northern Skies Observatory (NSO)…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 2: Enchanted Echachist

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…

The Expedition Begins: A Study of Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

The best adventures begin as dreams, and for me, this trip is no different. My dream started over a bad cup of instant coffee and a moderately difficult Sudoku puzzle in my living room in Rarotonga, Cook Islands. It was March 2012 and I was entrenched in a grass roots campaign to outlaw possession of…

BioBlitz Highlights From the Social Sphere

By Ryan White, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. The big story of BioBlitz can’t be told without all the small stories that make up the event. See some of the best tweets, photos, and more from this year’s event.

Wrapping Up Round Two

By Becca Peixotto, Caver/Scientist. In only eight days of digging, we retrieved more than 320 numbered fossil specimens and an awful lot of sediment. Don’t worry: there’s plenty more.

Pristine Seas: Mozambique Expedition Launches

As day dawns in the southeastern African coastal nation of Mozambique today, Pristine Seas Expedition Leader Paul Rose and team begin the latest in an ongoing series of missions to explore and document the biodiversity of the most untouched areas in the world’s oceans.

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? New Study Offers Strong Evidence

The zebra’s stripes evolved to keep pesky insects at bay, according to the most thorough study to date on the subject.

What’s an Acre of Seagrass Worth? $80,000 in Fish Alone

By Philine zu Ermgassen, postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University and Dr. Mark Spalding, senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy For decades, dire tales of collapsing fish stocks were told, only to fall on deaf ears. Then, in a 2008 report, “Sunken Billions,” the World Bank and the FAO began to couch the problem in entirely…

Geography in the News: The Gulf of Mexico’s Dead Zone

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Gulf’s Growing Dead Zone With rising demand over the past decade for the corn-based fuel additive ethanol, American farmers have grown more corn than at any time since World War II. Unfortunately, the nitrogen fertilizer being applied to cornfields is contributing to a…

Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Lab Opens in Mozambique

Professor Edward O. Wilson, a man heralded by the National Geographic Society as ‘the greatest naturalist of our time’, has lent his name and vision to a premier biodiversity research facility in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. The esteemed evolutionary biologist was the guest of honor at the opening of the ‘Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory’…