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Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About

This post is the first in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during his travels.   The idea for this new column came up as I was staring at a small fur seal puppy playing…

Bats Set Their Internal Compass at Dusk—A First Among Mammals

Bats may be known for their stealth in the dark, but a new study shows they need light from the setting sun to navigate.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #71

Woodpeckers, nutcrackers, flycatchers, sunbirds, roadrunners and babblers in this 71st Edition! Astonishing what can be achieved with a bit of patience, care and a passion for birds. Wild birds have become the subject of choice for thousands of photographers around the world. They extremely hard to photograph. You need the best equipment you have access to…

July 20, 2014 Radio Show: Making Music With Elephants, Running Hundreds of Miles Through Mountains and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend radio show we run ultramarathons through Nepal, Switzerland and Utah’s Rocky Mountains, then we save goliath, learn safety tips about the newest bacterial threat, making music with elephants, visit the world’s largest caverns, and find some secret cities.

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Climate Change Already Having Profound Impacts on Lakes in Europe

For perspective on how climate change is affecting lakes, those of us here in the U.S. can just look across the pond, where scientists and the agencies involved in meeting the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic. Not only are extreme weather events such as droughts…

45th Anniversary of First Men on the Moon: Spot Apollo Landing Sites

This Sunday marks the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. Learn how you can spy two of the Apollo landing sites with a set of binoculars.

Going on a Rock Cruise

Imagine two, 60-mile-thick slabs of rock running into each other. Which gives first and why? This is what happens when two oceanic plates go head to head, and one must buckle down, or subduct into a trench. In the western Pacific Ocean south of Japan, this is thought to have first occurred 52 million years…

Absaroka-Beartooth Front: Yellowstone’s wild front porch

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text By Jeff Welsch Photos by Dave Showalter, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). High on the rugged…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #70

Wow! The 70th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” demonstrates just how far we have come. This can only be described as an astonishing collection of wild bird photographs. 1750 amazing photographs of birds living free and wild published so far. We are looking for new ways to deliver all…

Why Oceans Are Critical to the Economy

As U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and others gathered in Washington, D.C. for the Our Ocean conference, Enric Sala sits down with Andrea Mitchell to explain why the ocean is more than just pretty fish.

A Childhood Dream: Why We Go on Sea Monster Expeditions

In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. Now, the team is planning yet another project, and are getting ready for another season in the Arctic slopes of Svalbard. However, there are still specimens remaining from the last field season, and they are more spectacular than ever.

A “Monumental” Boost for Endangered Species in the Pacific

President Obama recently pledged to expand the current boundaries of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, already one of the largest nature preserves on the planet. Here are just a few of the amazing creatures that would find refuge there.

Mystery Solved: Why Peacocks Got Their Eyespots

The brilliant plumage of peacocks and related birds may be a result of female preference, a new study says.

New Specimens, Friends, Colleagues, and Insights

Ronald Clouse is travelling the Philippines in search of harvestmen—otherwise known as daddy-long-legs. As he prepares to return home, Ron wraps everything up and makes his farewells.