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Journey of the Sea Lion, Part Two: Totem Poles, New and Old

Jon Waterhouse and Mary Marshall join the voyage of the National Geographic expedition vessel, the Sea Lion, to tour and discover some of the best that the ecosystems and cultures of the Pacific Northwest have to offer. As the journey continues, the Haida people showcase their ongoing way of life and stunning artwork.

Are Crows Smarter Than Children?

One clever young bird solved a problem that has stumped six-year-old children, according to a new study.

#okavango14: Over Africa’s Wetland Wilderness

Africa’s newly-minted UNESCO World Heritage Site, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, from the air and from space… This emerald green oasis buzzes with life during the summer months when grand thunderstorms sweep across the delta…

A Tahitian Welcome for the Worldwide Voyage

The Worldwide Voyage received a colorful and memorable welcome to Tahiti, which Hōkūle‘a crew member Ana Yawaramai writes about from her own perspective.

Mysterious Fossils in 3D

Emily Hughes brings us tales of adventure and discovery from the Australian Outback as she and her mother search for unbelievably ancient fossils. Pteridiniums are ancient organisms full of mystery—and those found in the Outback prove these life forms to be much older than previously thought.

Western Mediterranean Island Conservation

I am visiting the Iberian Peninsula this week en route to the 14th Rodens et Spatium conference in Portugal. Today in Valencia I am looking out over the Western Mediterranean basin. This area is steeped in human history, including upon its hundreds of islands. Romans colonised these parts over 2,000 years ago, and like everywhere…

Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About

This post is the first in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during his travels.   The idea for this new column came up as I was staring at a small fur seal puppy playing…

Bats Set Their Internal Compass at Dusk—A First Among Mammals

Bats may be known for their stealth in the dark, but a new study shows they need light from the setting sun to navigate.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #71

Woodpeckers, nutcrackers, flycatchers, sunbirds, roadrunners and babblers in this 71st Edition! Astonishing what can be achieved with a bit of patience, care and a passion for birds. Wild birds have become the subject of choice for thousands of photographers around the world. They extremely hard to photograph. You need the best equipment you have access to…

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Climate Change Already Having Profound Impacts on Lakes in Europe

For perspective on how climate change is affecting lakes, those of us here in the U.S. can just look across the pond, where scientists and the agencies involved in meeting the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic. Not only are extreme weather events such as droughts…

45th Anniversary of First Men on the Moon: Spot Apollo Landing Sites

This Sunday marks the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. Learn how you can spy two of the Apollo landing sites with a set of binoculars.

Going on a Rock Cruise

Imagine two, 60-mile-thick slabs of rock running into each other. Which gives first and why? This is what happens when two oceanic plates go head to head, and one must buckle down, or subduct into a trench. In the western Pacific Ocean south of Japan, this is thought to have first occurred 52 million years…

Absaroka-Beartooth Front: Yellowstone’s wild front porch

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text By Jeff Welsch Photos by Dave Showalter, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). High on the rugged…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #70

Wow! The 70th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” demonstrates just how far we have come. This can only be described as an astonishing collection of wild bird photographs. 1750 amazing photographs of birds living free and wild published so far. We are looking for new ways to deliver all…