National Geographic
Menu

Category archives for Science

Island Conservation in the Mozambique Channel

The April 2014 issue of National Geographic magazine has a fantastic photo-essay on two French islands of the Mozambique Channel: Europa and Bassas da India. The article describes the pristine marine environments around the islands along with some amazing dive shots. I was privileged enough to work on Europa Island throughout 2008, not on the…

Happy DNA Day: Genetic Results From New York City Students Reveal Microcosm of the World

Fifty-one years ago James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins, and Rosalind Franklin published a landmark paper on the structure of DNA. Since then, April 25 has been recognized as DNA Day, a day for celebrating all that we know about genetics, including what DNA tells us about our ancient past. Today, Genographic Project scientists are…

NKAF Summer Space Camp in Vermont: Adventures in Science for Teenagers

In early August 2013, Northern Skies Observatory (NSO) was abuzz with activity during the Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation’s (NKAF) successful summer Space Camp. Attendance was limited to 10 high school and middle school students, and these slots filled quickly. Students ranged in age from 12 to 17, and, while most were from Vermont, they hosted…

Marine Mammals Along California Coast Rescued in Record Numbers

As a leader in rescue and rehabilitation work, Shedd Aquarium has established partnerships with rescue organizations all over the country to respond to animals in need. This week, we are sharing a guest blog post from our partner – The Marine Mammal Center, the world’s largest rescue and rehabilitation hospital for sick, injured and orphaned…

What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says.

Q&A: What Can Dog Brains Tell Us About Humans?

Canine researcher Ádám Miklósi of the Family Dog Project gets us into the head of the family pooch—and how that could help us learn about our own brains.

Hagfish Slime Could Be Eco-Friendly Fabric

A new study on the defensive goo raises new mysteries and suggests it could be an eco-friendly alternative to nylon.

Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting…

America Resilient

Since we last celebrated Earth Day a year ago, 29 states have experienced 99 Federal disaster declarations. Fires, floods, mudslides, hurricanes, and tornadoes have devastated the United States, causing billions of dollars of damage, destroying thousands of homes, and up-ending people’s lives.

“Remarkable” New Salamander Disguises Itself as a Baby

A newfound species of lungless salamander from Arkansas has escaped scientists’ attention by looking like a juvenile of another species—until now.

Africa’s Submerged Savannas

Scientist Kike Ballesteros beautifully describes the diversity of Africa’s “Submberged Savannas” in this post from the Pristine Seas expedition in Mozambique.

Friends of Fins: Shark Fin ID Workshop During the Fiji Shark Expedition

We are shark researchers. We travel by boat to maximize our time on the water, to explore the reefs and record shark activity around remote islands surrounded by the deep blue. From dawn until dusk, we are fishing—elbow deep in freeze-thawed chunks of fish, oily flesh and watered down blood.  We revel in our ability to interact…

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

New Killer Sponges Found in the Deep Sea

The carnivorous invertebrates, discovered deep in the waters off California, use tiny hooks on their bodies to capture prey, a new study says.

The Penan Hunter-Gatherers of Sarawak

For the Penan of Sarawak’s rainforest, the raucous call of the white-crowned hornbill has long heralded dawn. Today, however, they are just as likely to be woken by the sound of chainsaws and falling trees. The tropical rainforest of Sarawak in Borneo, East Malaysia, is one of the most biologically rich forests on earth. It…