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Two Traditional Languages Evade Extinction With the Internet

The Enduring Voices Project helps save two traditional languages from being erased with the power of the internet.

Cosmic Dust Clouds Gravitational Wave Finding

Dust may explain away a gravitational wave discovery.

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

The Sea Turtle and the Captain

Captain Robert Thomas was fishing for Chinook salmon in the San Francisco Bay. His charter sport fishing boat, the Salty Lady, was near Buoy 1, just outside of the Golden Gate Bridge when they accidently foul-hooked an endangered Pacific green sea turtle. Thomas has been fishing these waters for decades and though he has seen…

MAVEN Arrives in Martian Orbit

MAVEN and Mars, two great things that now go together.

TEDMED: 50 ideas that might just change the face of health around the world

Hundreds of people surged up the steps of the Kennedy Center in Washington DC this month sporting the iconic oversized badges that only meant one thing – time for TEDMED. This famous – and exclusive – conference from the people behind TED Talks is attended by health innovators from all over the world. The aim…

Crashing Into Ice: The Impact of Climate Change, On My Head

Ruby, Françoise, and I are barefoot and wearing t-shirts as we conduct sea bird surveys from the prow of the M/V Cape Race. Between shifts we close our eyes, the sun warms our faces and it feels downright tropical. Opening our eyes again, we are reminded of where we are. Looming in the distance are massive, glassy ice bergs, which we will soon be swimming by.

7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Pulling Secrets from Deep-sea, Drillbit-Eating Rocks

Hidden seafloor can harbor tales of volcanic explosions. But getting it to cough up some stories can lead to a butchered drill bit.