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Mining in El Salvador: Can Corporate Behaviour be Changed?

Guest article by Vladimir Pacheco Central America remains a land of tremendous potential but persistent poverty. In vulnerable states recovering from civil strife and growing inequality, foreign corporate investment has additional obligations to ensure community consent through patient engagement. In this guest article, Vladimir Pacheco, a social scientist who has worked on mining and human…

Gift to the Maasai Mara, a Male Elephant is Born

By Joyce Poole Petter Granli and I left Cottars 1920s Safari Camp on the border of the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, the northern extension of the great Serengeti-Mara ecosystem. We were heading toward the Sand River crossing, where elephants had been seen the evening before. The route was not direct, as tracks twisted and…

Special Squeaky Sloth Video

National Geograpic Emerging Explorer Lucy Cooke, creator of Slothville, is on a one-woman crusade to show the world why some of the most unlovable animals are actually the most interesting and deserving of our attention, study, and protection. Her new book, The Little Book of Sloth, celebrates the sloth: the cutest, cuddliest, slowest creature on…

Houston Drives EV Green Changes with Perseverance and Partnerships

This post is authored by Margo Evans, Marketing Director, Smith & Associates and Founding Member of Smith Sustainability Group, Lisa Lin, Sustainability Manager, City of Houston, and Jedediah Greenfield, Public Information Officer, City of Houston. Sustainability is a critical element of the City of Houston’s planning. Over the next 15 years, this fourth-largest city in…

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Why Have Tigers Been Feared and Revered Throughout History?

Talking Tigers: Part 5 of a 12-part series Throughout human history, the diverse peoples who populated the vast Asian continent have had one thing in common: They feared and revered the tiger. Throughout this cat’s range, their stealthy, illusory habits—suddenly appearing and disappearing in dense forests, often at night—elevated them to the status of otherworldly beings.…

Trekking in the Footsteps of a Lone Wolf for Coexistence

In late 2011, a lone wolf walked across Oregon and entered California, becoming the first wild wolf in the state in nearly 90 years.

He was called a hero, a killing-machine, a rogue, a beacon of hope, a foreign invader from Canada, and school children named him Journey. No matter his name, he came to represent the return of wolves to their historic rangelands in the American Pacific Northwest.

Update From Colorado River Delta: A Community Gets its River Back

For more than two weeks, the Colorado River has been flowing in its delta, through more than 30 miles (48 kilometers) of recently bone-dry river channel choked with desert scrub.  The flow is all too brief, lasting only eight weeks in all.  The United States and Mexico are demonstrating how a “pulse flow” of water…

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

San Joaquin River Named #1 Most Endangered River in the U.S.

American Rivers today released its annual report of America’s Most Endangered Rivers, with California’s San Joaquin River at the top of the list.  Outdated water management, compounded by the current drought, have put the San Joaquin River at a critical crossroads. It is hard to overstate the importance of the San Joaquin River and its…

Exploring Montana’s Sea of Grass

By Ellen Anderson, American Prairie Reserve -  In prairie ecosystems, it is difficult to see the biodiversity that is there from the window of a vehicle, even for people who are plant nerds like my husband Lars and me. Who can really distinguish different grass species without walking out into the prairie? Once we throw…

Debunking Captivity: 3 Reasons Not to Keep Dolphins in a Tank

By Maddalena Bearzi   I have spent much time in the company of wild dolphins over the last twenty-something years. I’ve built a career following their everyday movements and observing their behavior both from shore and from research boats. When I began my studies, I knew these creatures primarily as the objects of my research but,…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #64

Kingfishers, fish-eagles, orioles, flycatchers, lovebirds, wagtails, bush-shrikes, broadbills, bee-eaters, and laughing-thrushes… A fantastic collection of wild bird photographs that sets the standard for 2014! All these photographers need to be commended for their commitment and skill. We need to do everything we can to make sure that our children get to see, hear and photograph…

An Octopus Bite and a Visit From Mozambique’s Youngest Ocean Explorers

A group of young local underwater enthusiasts called the Nemos Pequenos inspire the Pristine Seas team with their interest and excitement, and an esteemed scientist is bitten by an octopus, in this update from Mozambique.

Bad Weather, Weird Parrot Fish Fact, and More

Bad weather puts the pressure on the team to get the day’s underwater surveys done, but there’s still time to relate a weird-but-true fact about where sand comes from.