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Bardarbunga: Jokulhaups Alert!

In Iceland, Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to learn about other planets, particularly Mars. As the recent earthquakes around Bardarbunga intensify and eruption appears imminent, warnings of Jokulhaups ring from the dells.

A Year Ago Today: Spring in South Africa

National Geographic Young Explorer Evan Eifler is working to preserve the endangered ecosystems of South Africa, most notably the renosterveld. Check out the amazing images he has captured of endangered and unique flowers.

Q&A: Landmark Report Reveals Crucial Links in the Illegal Ivory Trade

While there are effectively unlimited numbers of poachers and consumers fueling the lucrative illegal ivory market, a new report suggests that nearly all the ivory shuttled from Africa to Asia—the biggest market—is confined to as few as 200 shipping containers a year.

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

Artist Anne Neely Evokes the Mystery and Magic of Water

Motivated by concern over growing threats to the world of water, Boston-area artist Anne Neely undertook a decade-long search to understand and interpret what is happening to rivers, lakes, oceans, glaciers and aquifers. “I approach painting by asking questions, just as a scientist does,” Neely writes in Water Stories, the companion book to the exhibit…

Welcoming Hōkūle’a to American Samoa With Dr. Sylvia Earle

Daniel Lin and Dr. Sylvia Earle (National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence) team up to write about their experience of greeting Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia in American Samoa, and to reflect on the health of the ocean there.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

View from Kinshasa: Minerals and Development in the Democratic Republic of Congo

From 2000 to 2005, I was asked to teach an annual module in environmental conflict resolution at a program for mid-career professionals from developing countries held at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme (funded by the Henry R. Luce Foundation). In one of the earlier…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

#Okavango14: Elephants Will Sense Your Calm

Ever wonder what it’s like to have an elephant watch you set up your tent at night? Stay calm, and the elephant will carry on.

Watch the Okavango Hangout Video!

The Okavango Google Hangout event is over, but you can still watch the recording and catch up on the highlights!

Who Will Save the Last Primary Forests on Earth?

By Brendan Mackey and James Watson

It’s now or never if the world’s surviving primary forests are to be saved. Will the international community act or continue to turn a blind eye to our planet’s key life support systems? Despite their shortcomings, international environmental agreements can provide incentives for national governments and land custodians to turn back the tide of forest destruction. Primary forests, however, remain invisible in forest policy debates and oddly off the radar for most conservation organizations.

Updates From the North Woods

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field,…

Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef…