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Woods Hole Research Center responds to misleading NY Times op-ed on climate change

  Climate scientists everywhere reacted with stunned outrage  as word spread about an op-ed piece in the New York Times on Sept. 20, 2014 under the headline: “To Save The Planet, Don’t Plant Trees.” Operating on kernals of truth that distort and misinterpret far larger facts and realities about the role of forests — tropical…

Rivers Need a Thorough Health Exam

Rivers are the blue arteries of the Earth. Their flows deliver sediment and nutrients to floodplains, deltas and coastal zones, some of the most biologically productive ecosystems on the planet.  They connect and sustain the web of life. So it might be surprising that globally we don’t systematically monitor their health.  Imagine damming and diverting…

What’s That Weird Purple Sea Creature? Explaining Viral Video

A weird garbage-like creature spotted in the Gulf of Mexico is a rare type of jellyfish relative, scientists say.

Congress Needs to Think Big About Fish

When you buy a house, do you inspect only the roof? Of course not. You look at the whole structure: the foundation, insulation, plumbing, and many other aspects that indicate the overall condition of a home. Taking a look at the big picture is wise when buying a house—and equally wise when making many other…

Wolf OR-7′s Journey in Photos From the Forest Floor

During the days we spent walking Wolf OR-7′s dispersal route, I found myself endlessly fascinated watching the landscape transform. As I walked, I photographed items from Oregon and California’s forest floor—it’s like seeing 1,200 miles through a straw.

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

The Sea Turtle and the Captain

Captain Robert Thomas was fishing for Chinook salmon in the San Francisco Bay. His charter sport fishing boat, the Salty Lady, was near Buoy 1, just outside of the Golden Gate Bridge when they accidentally foul-hooked an endangered Pacific green sea turtle. Thomas has been fishing these waters for decades and though he has seen…

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Crashing Into Ice: The Impact of Climate Change, on My Head

Ruby, Françoise, and I are barefoot and wearing t-shirts as we conduct sea bird surveys from the prow of the M/V Cape Race. Between shifts we close our eyes, the sun warms our faces and it feels downright tropical. Opening our eyes again, we are reminded of where we are. Looming in the distance are massive, glassy ice bergs, which we will soon be swimming by.

Lonesome George Unveiled in New York City

Lonesome George, the famous Galápagos Island tortoise that was the last of his kind when he died in 2012, is due to get some company.

Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.