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Colorado River Basin’s “Natural Capital” Delivers up to Half a Trillion in Annual Benefits, New Study Says

Last week I spent time around the Animas, La Plata, and San Juan Rivers in southwestern Colorado – generally the area between Pagosa Springs and Mesa Verde National Park, where the elaborate cliff-dwelling ruins of the Anasazi remind us that what we call home may not last forever. On one bright blue day pushing 90…

Two-Headed Dolphin Is Super Rare

A dead two-headed dolphin that washed ashore this week in Turkey is only the fifth-known case of conjoined twins in dolphins, experts say.

Hōkūle’a: Crew Training

With all the excitement of Worldwide Voyage being highlighted, it’s easy to forget that 90 percent of a successful voyage happens not in the implementation, but rather, in the preparation. Before ever stepping onto Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia, prospective crew members must undergo intensive training to ensure that they are adequately prepared for sailing in the deep sea.

Whales and Dolphins Squeal With Delight, Study Finds

Whales and dolphins express their anticipation of a reward by squealing like kids, a new study confirms for the first time.

Searching for Sustainabile Clothing in India

Andrew Flachs researchers the trials of Indian farmers and their rush toward modern farming practices, such as GMO crops and new pesticides. With time to reflect on his journey, he explains why these farmers do what they do, and why the question of how to approach farming is a complex one.

Small Caribbean Island Shows Bold Ocean Leadership: Barbuda Overhauls Reef and Fisheries Management for Sustainability

On August 12th, Barbuda Council signed into law a sweeping set of new ocean management regulations that zone their coastal waters, strengthen fisheries management, and establish a network of marine sanctuaries. This comes after seventeen months of extensive community consultation and scientific research supported by the Waitt Institute. With these new policies, the small island…

#okavango14: First-Ever Live-Data Expedition Across Okavango Delta

As the Okavango

Over-Invasion of Invasive Species

With invasive species colonising more and more locations it is only a matter of time before two similar species come in to contact with one another. Looking at the existing literature it seems there are already many cases of this, such as in similar species of foxes, wasps, ants, crayfish and plants. Our work looking…

They Aren’t Always Smiling: Skin Lesions and Deformities Plague Wild Dolphins

Dolphins are top predators, meaning they feed at the top of the food chain. When chemical pollutants settle into seafloor sediments, they are absorbed by a variety of small organisms. Some of these creatures end up in the stomachs of bottom feeders, which, in turn, accumulate higher concentrations of the same contaminants in their body…

The Ese’Eja: From a Cotton Thread in the Sky to Protectors of the Amazon

The Ese’Eja of the Madre de Dios Amazon region in Peru received a Genographic Project Legacy Fund grant to help preserve their culture, stories and language. As outside pressures mount and the battle with the Peruvian government over resources continues, Ese’Eja President Carlos Dejaviso Poje asks: Will our culture be here tomorrow?

13 Things You Probably Don’t Know About the U.S. Water System (But Should)

  It’s been a rough year for the U.S. water system already, and it’s only summer. Two U.S. cities (Charleston, West Virginia, and Toledo, Ohio) have gone for days with no safe water service. The nation’s largest reservoir is lower than it’s ever been. The nation’s largest state is in the worst drought ever recorded.…

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway

Rocking lazily in the gentle swell as our floating country of 113 people steams out to the first drill site offers me time to recollect what it takes to finally pull out of port. Stepping aboard this 471-foot ocean drill ship, which flies a Cyprus flag, are 30 scientists hailing from countries such as France,…

Mako Shark Madness

In honor of Shark Week, for the next few days I am going to be posting some cool facts and photos of the sharks I have had the pleasure of swimming with. Check out the Shortfin Mako Shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), one of the fastest fish in the ocean.   Shortfin Mako facts at a glance…

A tribute to elephants

One of Earth’s most influential keystone species may be disappearing at a rate of one every 15 minutes. This is a tribute to these giants and the way they have touched the lives of those of us lucky enough to have watched the water spill from their trunks and heard their gentle thunder. Let us…

CA Farmers Find Unlikely Ally In Weathering Drought: A Major Utility Company

By Peyton Fleming Senior Communications Director, Ceres Joe Segura works for the electric and gas utility PG&E, but he sounds more like a farmer when you spend time with him. Driving around the drought-parched San Joaquin Valley here in California’s Central Valley, Segura winces as he describes groundwater wells “being sucked dry” and drives by…