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#Okavango14: Elephants Will Sense Your Calm

Ever wonder what it’s like to have an elephant watch you set up your tent at night? Stay calm, and the elephant will carry on.

Watch the Okavango Hangout Video!

The Okavango Google Hangout event is over, but you can still watch the recording and catch up on the highlights!

Who Will Save the Last Primary Forests on Earth?

By Brendan Mackey and James Watson

It’s now or never if the world’s surviving primary forests are to be saved. Will the international community act or continue to turn a blind eye to our planet’s key life support systems? Despite their shortcomings, international environmental agreements can provide incentives for national governments and land custodians to turn back the tide of forest destruction. Primary forests, however, remain invisible in forest policy debates and oddly off the radar for most conservation organizations.

Updates From the North Woods

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field,…

Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef…

Are You Kidding? Larger Tanks Won’t Cut it for Killer Whales

Once again Sea World is missing the point. The aquatic entertainment enterprise just doesn’t seem to give up despite documentaries like Blackfish and a growing public awareness that keeping cetaceans in captivity is cruel and morally wrong. Even Wall Street is turning its back on the company. Now, with a new and grandiose multi-million dollar plan for expanding their killer whale tanks, Sea World is taking the “logical” next step to resurrect itself.

Young Farmers in the Western U. S. Adapt to a Water-Scarce Future

Sipping raw, whole, grass-fed milk is a bit like tasting fine wine: a familiar experience, but much more special. That was my feeling when I drank a glass this week from De Smet Dairy in Bosque Farms, New Mexico, a small town nestled in the middle Rio Grande Valley. With his wife Erica, Mike De…

Open Source #Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

On day two, we found ourselves hushed and intensely listening on the side of the channel in our mokoros, the traditional canoe of the baYei people. The air was tense as we waited as a result of the nearby rumblings of a male elephant. I have never felt so simultaneously excited and anxious at the…

The Hunt for Alpaca … Skeletons

Sarah Kennedy is using animal remains to dig through Peru’s colonial past. By comparing bone shards from Peru’s northern coast to an alpaca skeleton from Cusco, she might be able to show what Peruvians ate under Spanish rule.

Iceland: Raw, Rugged, and a Warm-Up for Mars

In Iceland, Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to learn about other planets, particularly Mars. Her expedition kicks off with some amazing sights and the threat of a nearby volcanic eruption imminent.

Longtime Sea Urchin Diving Partners Lead the Way in Sea Kelp Restoration, Technology and Collaboration

By Leanne Weiss Terry Herzik (67), Gary Thompson (71), and Lucy, Gary’s 8-year-old Chihuahua, board the Sunstar at dawn with enough food and fuel for the next three days. As they pull away, in their 34-foot vessel the sun is just beginning to rise over Fish Harbor, in San Pedro, Los Angeles. They’ll head southwest…

Public Helps Restore Flows to Critically Depleted Rivers

Change the Course, a water restoration movement led by National Geographic Fellow Sandra Postel, has encouraged some 70,000 people to cut their water footprint and restored 2 billion gallons of water to the Colorado River Basin. The model will be presented at this year’s Stockholm Water Symposium during World Water Week.

August 17, 2014 Radio Show: Speaking to Hippos, American Seafood Industry Secrets, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they explore Africa, fish to satisfy America’s seafood appetite, prevent pollinator colonies from collapsing, provide energy to India’s powerless, road trip 25,000 miles with children, save the lion, understand sperm whale “culture”, and follow our noses to find love.

Eric Chen’s Galápagos Getaway

Eric Chen is the grand prize winner of this year’s Google Science Fair for his work on new influenza treatments. As part of his prize, he was invited by National Geographic to tour the Galapagos Islands and encounter all that nature has to offer. For this young biochemist, visiting the cradle of the theory of evolution was a dream come true. National Geographic has been a Google Science Fair partner since it launched four years ago.

Geography in the News: The Strangest Desert

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Strange Namib Desert of Africa Africa seems to always be in the news covering conflict and disease across the continent. Its wonderful physical diversity, however, provides a background that is often overlooked by the casual reader. The Namib Desert is just one of…